PODCAST

Podcast Creation and Marketing with Podmotion

Sheelagh Caygill

The Podmotion Podcast: The Art of Podcast Production & Promotion is created and produced by Podmotion.co, a podcast production and marketing agency based in Toronto, serving the world. The Podmotion show provides listeners with valuable information and actionable tips about podcast production, marketing, and promotion. We cover everything about podcasts - from interview techniques, sound, marketing, and website development, through to editing, content creation, social media marketing, and email newsletter marketing. This is the show you want to listen to if you're a professional podcaster, an independent podcaster, in marketing or comms/PR, or interested in the podcast industry as a whole. The Podmotion team is happy to answer your questions, too. So get in touch any time at Podmotion.co.

How to create a podcast show from a weekly roundtable meeting
25-11-2021
How to create a podcast show from a weekly roundtable meeting
When you daily job involves absorbing specialist information that's valuable to clients, and regularly discussing it with colleagues, you could have the makings of a podcast show!This episode from Podmotion features Rob Finlay, commercial real estate (CRE) owner, operator, and expert. Rob is a thought leader, podcaster, and CEO of Thirty Capital, a provider of services and solutions to commercial real estate firms. Rob's podcast, Commercial Real Estate Capital Markets Report, launched in April after he talked to a friend about a regular weekly call he has with his team of senior traders. The friend asked Rob if he could listen in to the call, and that's when Rob realized it might be a good idea to turn the weekly roundtable discussion into a podcast show. Each roundtable episode discusses treasury rates, short-term rates, and everything related to debt and debt optimization for commercial real estate. Each episode helps CRE professionals determine if it is time to refinance, borrow, or what kind of action they should take to optimize or leverage their debt.Before the podcast show launched, the weekly call took place and Rob and his team absorbed all the information shared during the roundtable, and shared it with callers if they thought it was relevant or important.Rob appreciates the diverse opinions that his analysts present in each episode. They are at a senior level, so of course they are opinionated. This discussion makes for a very animated conversation about how the capital markets could evolve in the coming, days, weeks, and months. Even though the meeting is now a podcast, it still has a informality about it, and listeners feel that they are right there in the meeting with Rob and his team.  They've been able to find the sweat spot where the informal collegial chat is absent, but it's not super formal.Rob encourages podcasters to learn and experiment as they go, and to not be afraid of the ever-evolving process. Feedback is crucial, as is room for growth. He says the best thing about doing the show is the feedback and suggestions they are receiving from the listener. They are getting questions as well as feedback, and aim to answer them in the show. They questions also play a role in shaping the content of upcoming shows. In this episode Rob also discusses:Figuring out how to slightly tweak the meeting format so it could be recordedWorking with a consultant to launch a showHow the new show has transformed Thirty Capital's lead generation and marketingHow much his team is enjoying being involved in the showEquipment used for the showSetting up measurable goals and expectations for a podcast show.Find Rob on LinkedIn, Twitter, and at Thirty Capital.
How to start and grow a successful podcast show
14-11-2021
How to start and grow a successful podcast show
Podmotion.co thanks Rob Finlay, host of the CRE Capital Markets Report roundtable podcast, for sponsoring this episode! Find Rob's show here!Nick DiBartolomeo and Bruno Pierce are started a new podcast this early this year - then thousands of others started podcasts too!By being focused on community building, experimentation, and mastering social media, Nick and Bruno have achieved a level of success that eludes many new podcasters.Their show is called Quit The Build, and it's the voice of their gaming community - Quit The Build. Even if you're not a gamer, we recommend you listen to this episode. Nick is our guest and he gives a masterclass in how to start and grow a podcast. He gives an amazing amount of information and actionable tips on how to start a show and see it grow. During this conversation Nick and Sheelagh discuss sponsorship techniques and mention a website called Podthreads - this website no longer exists, just in case you decide to Google it!In this episode Nick shares his number one lesson for new podcasters. Nick and host Sheelagh Caygill explore:Take lots of time to plan out your show and it's format - Nick and Bruno spent a month planning before launchDon't launch a show with the sole intention of making moneyHave a goal for your show - for Nick and Bruno, it's shoot for the stars!Be as professional as your budget will allow with your show's brandingHow to plan out an episodeWhy being friends with your host means you'll have great synergy behind the micHow understanding the importance of content creation will help you grow your showWhy Twitter is essential for podcast growth and engagementHow to successfully use one clip and share it across platforms as an audiogramLearning from other podcasters and watching their tactics; try them out and see if they work for your showBeing patient with your progress - it takes time to find a rhythm with a showMonetization through sponsorship, Patreon, and advertising.If you have any questions about this episode, or podcasting in general, get in touch with Podmotion at info at podmotion.co.Thanks for listening and stay safe.
Podcasting: Low Barrier To Entry Makes Quality Content Hard to Come By
24-08-2021
Podcasting: Low Barrier To Entry Makes Quality Content Hard to Come By
Eli Schwartz released his first book, Product-Led SEO early this year. The release came during the pandemic, so speaking gigs and appearances in book shops were out. Instead, Eli turned to podcasts to promote his book. 'I've met some really bad podcasters'Eli's experience is a sharp reminder to podcasters: You really have to up your game if you want to be worthy of a listener's time. Eli says it's too easy for people to buy a mic, sit behind it, and make a show. What's missing is the thought, planning, and preparation that needs to go into a new podcast. Podcasting is competing with a massive amount of content for people's attention. If you're commuting, running, or or doing stuff at home, you can choose from audio books, radio, or music. And if you're just sitting around, streaming, TV, gaming, and YouTube are options. In one example, Eli said a podcaster asked him to spend hours writing a script which the host would then read. "That is ridiculous, and I don't understand why anyone would listen to a podcast like that," he says, adding he refused the request. "You may have a big name behind it. It may be launched by a big brand, but that low barrier to entry really makes a quality hard to come by."The Value Trade: A Podcaster Is Getting Something For FreeEli points out that guests create content, which fulfills the requirement for the podcast host to continually produce content. "Maybe the podcast has a sponsor. So now the guest is helping them to produce that content. And as a result, they can now get that podcast sponsored."So from a value trade-off standpoint, a podcaster does have to be putting more work into preparation, and into making sure that the flow of the podcast is good, and high-quality for the listener," continues Eli, noting that the exception is if a podcaster is famous, then it's a privilege to be on their show. Eli doesn't go onto podcasts expecting that he's going to get a consulting engagement out of it, or sell books. "I'm going to do podcasts because I think it's interesting. And I like talking with interesting podcasters.A guest may or may not get value, but it's not guaranteed.What Does Good Preparation Look Like?Every podcaster and guest has their own way of preparing. If you're producing a good show and aiming for top-notch guests, be grateful for their time and make guesting as easy as possible.Hosts should read about an upcoming guest and their recent activities and achievements. Check out some of their recent blog posts. Listen to any previous podcast show appearances. Make an effort to come up with some really interesting questions that a host hasn't asked before. Making an effort to dig a bit deeper can really pay off. Ask why, or what something might mean. Look for insights and actionable tips. If they've written a book, make an effort to read it.At Podmotion we usually send through questions ahead of an interview, but that doesn't mean the interview has to be scripted. If there is an interesting digression that's relevant to the audience, we go for it.For a guest, preparation means understanding the focus of the interview, listening to a show's previous episodes. If a host doesn't send any questions in advance, be sure ask what the focus of the interview will be. Send through your bio or a link to one, as well as any links you want in the show notes. Find Eli on LinkedIn, at EliSchwartz.co, and ProductLedSEO.com. Eli's favourite podcast guest appearance on the Y Combinator podcast.
Podcast listener engagement, community on whole new level with Listen App
07-07-2021
Podcast listener engagement, community on whole new level with Listen App
Paul Mikhaylenko has a vision for podcasts, podcasters, and listeners. And it's all about real participation in shows, engagement, and community-building.The industry expert is Founder and CEO of Listen App, and Director of Product at Trend Capital Holdings. Paul is also founder and CEO of Bloom, a CRM platform for freelancers.Listen App is a place where podcasters can host podcast events and actually get questions and comments from their audience. This can content can be recorded and used as part of an upcoming episode, if the podcast host wants. Listen App is also a podcast player app. It is available on Apple, with Android coming very soon. Listen App means that a host can be interviewing a guest, while allowing an audience to listen in. A host can bring in audience members to ask questions. Listeners will have questions a host may not have considered that will actually bring tons of colour and insights. "Listen App it fosters engagement, where it's not just this monologue that people are listening to, but they feel like the stage is open for engagement and participation, where their voices can be heard.  "We're creating a platform where podcaster can host events, and invite their listeners to join into the conversation like you would on Clubhouse. You'd record those conversations and edit them. Maybe somebody asked the question that you want to share with the rest of the listener group. And on the next episode, you include that interaction in there."The Difficulty Of Building Podcast CommunitiesPart of the issue around creating podcasting communities is that it's a different medium from anything else that we've experienced on a mass scale. The only thing in audio that we've done before is radio. "Even with radio, the most you can have in terms of listener engagement is call-ins, but you wouldn't have necessarily communities built around radio stations," Paul continues. "The thing about audio is that it's tapping into what you might call like the last frontier of human attention available, and it's a multitasking attention."Most audio listeners are disengaged from their devices, and multitasking. They're receiving content in an input mode, where it's non-interactive versus if you're on a website.  Paul sees podcasting as the frontier of specific and tailored community engagement. "We have to understand all of the pieces of how podcasting is using audio, but also what are the types of content that actually require and would flourish with, you know, a community built around them?"The Future Of PodcastingWith the power plays between the big tech giants, Paul thinks that many are trying to take advantage of podcasting, because it's under-monetized. A lot of tech companies are seeing opportunities for themselves. He doesn't know if Facebook's entry into audio will be a good experience for podcast communities or not. With the Apple subscription piece, he notes that Apple still doesn't have an Android app. He advises creators to think twice before using Apple subscriptions. "Unless I knew that 90 percent of my users were Apple-only, because you're cutting off all your Android users from your premium offering that you're putting a lot of time into." Paul envisions that a year from now the podcasting world will see a lot more exclusive and paid content, along with more monetization models. "Podcasters need to be compensated for their work, and they need a way to feed their families and fund these projects. Right now, that doesn't exist. Our goal is to be facilitating that for podcasters who want to have communities. Our goal is to become the dominant player for that specific application."Go to Podmotion.co for the full show notes.
How to be a better podcast guest and a better show host
14-04-2021
How to be a better podcast guest and a better show host
This episode of the Podmotion podcast is brought to you by Podthreads.com, clothing and accessories for the podcast-obsessed and independent podcasters!--Alain Hunkins published his book Cracking The Leadership Code on March 24, 2020 - the week the world went into lockdown.A speaker and leadership coach, Alain had no choice but to promote his book virtually, and a key tactic was podcast interviews with shows in the U.S, Canada, and the U.K. In fact, Alain has done more than 130 interviews!Without doubt, he's learned a great deal about what makes a good podcast show guest and what makes a good show host. Here's a little preview of Alain's astute insights into the world the podcast show host-guest dynamic. Alain says: "Some hosts have blown me away. They've read my book. They've had specific questions about things in the book, they've had things they wanted to challenge around that, where it's become a very spirited, lively conversation."In contrast, some hosts won't go deep or explore, and the questions are very basic, stock questions. "Then I finished answering that question, and they have no follow up question to that. I feel like it's been a tick-box exercise."I'll make it work. I can do the best I can. But I look back on those interviews and think 'Really? I mean, is that it? Is that is that all we're doing here?'. Because it's so generic. And again, people want to hear that moment of insight. "I can bring as much dynamism to my side of the table, but people prefer tennis matches where they're not one sided. We want the sense of we're hitting the ball back and forth over the net. It's much more interesting."This is why Alain believes preparation is so important. As an example, Alain says when he trains leaders he always says the map is not the territory, so do all your preparation. As a show host, when you show up to interview people, be present, be in the moment, be curious.In feedback to one host, Alain told them he'd had an amazing interview, and the host replied: "I'm curious, I actually want to interview and learn something in this hour. Otherwise, I feel like I'm wasting my time as a host." In this conversation with Podmotion's  Sheelagh Caygill, Alain discusses:How to reach out to show hostsWhy tenacity pays off in securing interviewsWhat kind of information to provide hostsHow to prepare for an interviewThe difference between a good host and a boring oneHow hosts can prepare to interview a guestHow hosts who go off-script can end up with a great episodeWhy hosts shouldn't be afraid to go down rabbit holes and explore more deeply, andHow hosts can exercise their intuitive muscle and come up with great questions.Find Alain online at AlainHunkins.com, and LinkedIn.
Behind The Scenes With The Hope Strategy Podcast
16-12-2020
Behind The Scenes With The Hope Strategy Podcast
It's not often that podcast show producers open the doors to reveal everything about how they produce their show. Least of all successful entrepreneurs.But Podmotion is fortunate to get Josh Steimle and Corey Blake to do just that. Behind The Scenes With The Hope Strategy Podcast is a conversation between the hosts of the Hope Strategy Podcast - Josh and Corey. In this episode you'll hear about their podcasting philosophy, and learn how to produce better episodes.Josh and Corey tell listeners about their aspirations for the Hope Strategy Podcast - and how they hope that if they can inspire just one person with their show, it'll make it worthwhile.The two men share their origin story, how they found their grove as co-hosts,  what kind of guests they seek, and the equipment they use. They explain why research before an interview is so important, and how video recording an interview really helps hosts with responses to non-verbal cues - even if you don't plan to release the video. And to weary podcasters who sometimes feel like all the hard work is in vain, hang in there! Josh notes that most podcasters don't make it past the first dozen or so episodes. So if you keep going, you'll be in a kind of elite group of podcasters! If you haven't listened to the Hope Strategy Podcast  yet, we  highly recommend it. It features some amazing guests and very insightful interviews. Some of our favourites are include Kara Goldin, author of Undaunted, and Peter Kozodoy, author of Honest to Greatness, as well as the interviews with Josh and Corey.Thanks to Josh and Corey for doing this interview for Podmotion!If you want to share your Podcasting story in an episode of the Podmotion podcast, get in touch with us at podmotion.co.Thanks for listening, and if you enjoy this episode, be sure to share it with a friend!Links:Follow the Hope Strategy Podcast on Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter.Josh SteimleCorey Blake
Grow your podcast with email newsletter marketing
13-10-2020
Grow your podcast with email newsletter marketing
In this episode of the Podcast Production and Promotion Podcast we speak with Tyler McCune, a professional email newsletter writer in California.Tyler owns Copy By McCune. He has an impressive roster of clients for whom he writes newsletters, and is also a content strategist and copywriterTyler and  host Sheelagh Caygill speak about how to use email newsletters to help grow a smaller, independent podcast.Tyler recommends beginning marketing with writing email newsletters, rather than focusing on long sales letters, which can be more complicated to develop.Grow your brandWith email newsletters, it’s probably best not to start one off with the sole intention of growing your audience. For existing listeners, a  newsletter can really activate those listeners and take them from being someone who simply listens to your show to someone who becomes a real fan of you and your brand. Use a show to really engage to really engage your existing fans and overtime you will be positioning yourself as a thought leader. And of course, in each newsletter, you can ask your readers to share it with anyone who will be interested.Getting email newsletter sign-upsHeard of the ethical bribe? You want people to sign up to your e-mail newsletter list, right?  this is where the ethical bride comes in. You give the potential newsletter to read something that they want. Here are some examples: a hidden podcast that only newsletter subscribers have access to, a free template, or an e-book. Choose the right lead magnet for your your listener. But for podcast fans, an audio file is a good choice, given that they already like podcasts.You could use something that you once sold as a lead magnet. That allows you to put a value figure on the lead magnet.Writing styleYour writing style will depend on your audience. Your style should come out of your personality, and usually most email newsletter writers tend to write a newsletter as though they are writing to a friend. However, this does take time, and for some writers it can take years to nail their persona.Of course, this style doesn’t lend itself to every podcaster who gets into newsletter writing. It’s important to think to think about the persona you want. For some podcasters, they will want to be seen as thought leaders, an so that can mean including things like industry updates, as well as your own news.Remember, it’s hard to compete with well-established thought leaders or marketers, so don’t try to compete with them. Go off script and focus on building a bond with your listeners. If you go along with the storytelling format, be sure to infuse your stories with meaning.Promoting your newsletter on social mediaBefore you begin promoting your newsletter on social media, think about what you want in terms of the end result.  Go back to your opt in or ethical bride and ensure it aligns with your end goal. Sell the benefit of subscribing - what’s in it for them? To this end, Tyler recommends the book How to Win Friends and Influence People, by Dale Carnegie - which gets readers to focus on thinking from another person’s perspective, and thinking about what makes them happy.At the end of the day, if you keep the experience of writing fairly simple. Talk to your email newsletter readers as you would to a friend, or the way you talk to your podcast audience. If you do this, over time you will improve and people will like what you do.Show notes:Tyler's first interview with Sheelagh.Marketing Bullets - by Gary Bencivenga.Swiped - for control and test copy.Find Tyler at
How to use influencer marketing to grow your podcast
09-09-2020
How to use influencer marketing to grow your podcast
Neal Shaffer has an in-depth understanding of influencer marketing.He's been working in this area for years and has recently published The Age of Influence: The Power of Influencers to Elevate Your Brand.The Podcast Promotion and Production Podcast is lucky enough to have some time with Neal to discuss influencer marketing, and how to use influencer marketing to grow your podcast show.Neal explores podcast marketing through the lens of influence. He points out something that's obvious but sometimes not realized by podcasters: The fact that you're a podcaster makes you an influencer.From that starting point, hosting influential guests and being on other growing podcast shows are ways of growing your influence, and using influence marketing to grow your show. But you must research guests and ensure they're a good fit for your show. And you need to ensure the shows you appear on are a good fit for your own growing influence.Neal discusses additional tactics to use a guest's influence or your growing influence to increase your your audience.Neal is a digital and social media consultant, and author of three other books, in addition to The Age of Influence. Resources mentioned in the show: The "other" podcast Neal talks about; the Podmotion Newsletter; Neal's August 27 episode - Why I'm Investing Time in Being Interviewed on 100 Different Podcasts; Nealschaffer.com.Check out our podcasting host, Buzzsprout. Start your own podcast, and receive a $20 Amazon voucher when you host your show at Buzzsprout by clicking this link.
The Art of The Podcast Interview
27-08-2020
The Art of The Podcast Interview
Many people say that interviewing is an art. The truth is that it's a combination of preparation, curiosity, empathy, and deep listening.In our latest episode of the Podcast Production and Promotion Podcast, journalist and podcast producer Amanda Cupido explains how to do a really good interview.Amanda discusses the need for solid preparation, and why it's important to find the balance between being prepared but not over-preparing. She explores the importance of making a guest comfortable, how to ask questions, revisiting topics if a guest doesn't answer fully, and showing empathy when guests discuss painful or sensitive issues.Amanda shares stories from some of her most difficult interviews, along with some of her favourite interviewers for listeners to learn from. Amanda is author of the book Let’s Talk Podcasting: The Essential Guide to Doing It Right, and a media instructor at Seneca College in Ontario, Canada.You can find Amanda at amandacupido.com. Some of her favourite interviewers are:Krista Tippett, host of the On Being Podcast Show, and in particular this interview with Brene Brown.WTF with Marc MaronAnd we also recommend listening recent production on cybersecurity called Get It, both for the content and Amanda's interview skills.Check out our podcasting host, Pinecast. Start your own podcast for free, no credit card required, forever. If you decide to upgrade, use coupon code r-2e3a06 for 40% off for 4 months, and support The Podmotion Show.
How To Get The Best Possible Sound From Your Podcast
12-08-2020
How To Get The Best Possible Sound From Your Podcast
The latest episode speaks to one of its team members, Liam Morrison, about how to get the best possible sound from your podcast show.Liam is Podmotion's Audio Production Editor, and is also creative partner with a number of audio and video creators in and around Toronto. In this interview with Kevin McCall, Podmotion Partner and Tech Lead, Liam shares actionable tips for podcasters, as well as some insight into what the post-production process can do to improve audio quality. Podcasting can be dauntingLiam acknowledges that getting into podcasting be daunting at first. "You are basically putting out content that theoretically is about has to compete with Oprah and Conan O'Brien and Gary Vee, stuff like that."So it's definitely daunting but the great thing is that with the technology, even if you're recording it on a USB microphone or iPhone . . .  you can actually put something up and get an audience on the same platform as someone like Oprah or Conan O'Brien."Avoid background noiseThe main things new podcasters must avoid is background noise. Liam advises newbie podcasters not to record next to their laundry machine while it's running."Try and get a nice quiet spot of your room or your apartment or your house. For me, usually what I do is I actually just literally put a sweater over top of my microphone so that only my voice is going towards it," explains Liam.A microphone, even though it's facing your face, will pick up what's happening behind it - the noise reflections off of the wall, ceiling, or the floor. Every hard piece of furniture, even mirrors and glass frames, will reflect noise back. So try to record in a room with soft furnishings and, if possible, cover mirrors with a throw.Keep your eye on the levelsPodcasters should also watch the levels when they are recording  and make necessary adjustments."Just be aware of where you are, how loud you're speaking, aware that you're speaking into a technology that has tools for you to monitor, so you can monitor those tools yourself if you need to, with the audio with the level with the volume. And treat your recording space as a professional studio."A professional's touchIf mistakes occur, or someone bursts in when you're recording, there is a lot that can be done to fix and enhance audio files."The amount that it can be fixed is kind of impressive," explains LIam. "I use tools like equalization, compression, and dynamic limiting."I even often use reverb to kind of make it sound like they're in a small studio. So it's like a very subtle reverb that kind of makes them sound like they're in a vocal recording booth, even if they're just in their room or if they're in their kitchen or something. It's kind of impressive," he adds.Liam says that one of his favourite tools is a plugin that enhances bass that gives podcasters a kind of an NPR radio voice - similar to being really close to a mic. And one of Liam's final tips is to use a professional podcast editor, no matter how small your show. A professional editor can make a world of difference, and also ensure that your recordings sound great on all platforms - including computer speakers, car audio systems, laptops, and smartphone.  Contact Podmotion.co for assistance with any aspect of podcasting. We're here to help!
How to improve and better market your podcast
30-07-2020
How to improve and better market your podcast
Wanting to get into podcasting can be overwhelming. Begin by thinking about your why – what do you want to accomplish with your podcast, even if it’s a hobby. Plan out some episodes, and then consider a podcasting host, equipment, a set-up for long-distance interviews, but don’t spend too much money to begin.In this episode we speak with marketing and podcaster Marc Guberti, host of three podcast shows: Breakthrough Success, Profitable Public Speaking, and Ditch the Job!Marc notes that lots of hopeful podcasters are deterred by fear. If this is holding you back, Marc recommends simply jumping in. Yes, listen to a few of your favourite podcasts first, but don’t put off starting your podcast for too long. And stay focused on the fact that you’ll get better as time goes on. By episode seven or eight, you’ll hear a marked improvement in your interview and presentation skills.A key to podcast marketing is to use as many social media platforms as possible to promote your show. Use visuals to engage people, and ask guests to promote their episodes, too.Producing great content is vital. Select guests who really add value to your episodes, and work on your questions and delivery for continual improvement.Marc says that for podcast hosts, one of the eventual challenges is removing “ums” or any other speech space filler. Don’t worry about this initially, but it’s certainly something to work towards as you make progress. Serious podcasters might even want to work with a speech coach – especially if a longer-term goal is to get into public speaking.Find Marc Guberti at to begin your podcast? Don't have time to work on your show? Contact the team at Podmotion.co today!Receive a $20 gift card when you sign-up to Buzzsprout podcast hosting! Podmotion recommends Buzzsprout.
Tell Us What Aspect Of Podcasting You're Struggling With
25-07-2020
Tell Us What Aspect Of Podcasting You're Struggling With
Link: Podmotion.coWhat Sets Podmotion Apart, Tell Us What You NeedHi, I'm Liam Morrison, the Audio-Video Production Editor at Podmotion dot co. Welcome to episode two of the Podcast Production and Promotion Podcast.If you've had time to listen to episode one, you'll know a little bit about us. In this episode, I'll talk briefly about what sets us apart from other podcast companies or agencies. Next, I'm encouraging you to get in touch and talk about your needs and how we can serve you improve so that your client experience is the best it can possibly be.Members of the Podmotion team have been involved in podcasting for many years. The questions we hear over and over from podcasters, or organizations and individuals wanting to get into podcasting are: Where do I begin? How do I plan out my show? Who knows a good podcast editor? and lastly How do I promote my show and get more listeners?When answering these questions, it's important to remember that each stage of podcasting is connected to the next. It's so obvious, but many podcasters forget how dependent the next stage of podcasting is on the previous stage. Here's what I mean: If there are issues with your show's sound quality, it's going to be challenging to get more listeners. A show without a strategy and no guest research will lead to weak interviews, and below par interviews can lead to poor content. The result will be that listeners won't care when your next episode drops. And no-one's happy with that.This is why at podmotion we realized that joining up the technical aspects of production with research, strategy, content development, and marketing makes perfect sense.It's a winning formula for clients. Because an agency that really understands your show objectives and produces your episodes knows what you really want. And so we're able to create truly effective strategies to promote and market your episodes. This seamless journey removes obstacles and relieves you of the immense work and challenges that can get in the way of creating great podcast shows.Of course, you don't have to use our full, end-to-end service. You're welcome to choose and mix the Podmotion solutions you need. And if you're unsure about what you DO need, we're always here to advise and guide.Next, please contact the podmotion team and tell us what your challenges are, or what solutions you think we need to add to our current range of services. How can we better help you with your podcast planning or existing show? We want to hear from you with your questions and suggestions. So please do get in touch.
Welcome to Podcast Production and Promotion
25-07-2020
Welcome to Podcast Production and Promotion
Links:  Hi, and welcome to the very first episode of the Podmotion podcast.My name is Liam Morrison and I'm the Audio-Visual Production Editor at Podmotion.co. We're a new podcast production and promotion agency, based primarily in Toronto, Canada. We have a distributed team, with members in the UK, Australia, and the US.We work with businesses, in-house teams, non-profits, independent podcasters - any kind of podcaster, in fact. And our goal is to make podcast production and promotion as painless and efficient as possible.What can we do for you? Well, the first step is listening - to what you want, your questions, or your pain points. Next, we provide you with solutions. For example, if you're looking to start a podcast and don't know where to begin, we'll give you the best options for your needs and set-up. If you already have a show and want to grow your audience, our digital marketer Lachlan Kirkwood can devise a plan for targeted growthContent creation from your episodes is key to maximizing your show's exposure. Sheelagh Caygill is our content team. She is joined by Tyler McCune, an outstanding content strategist, copywriter, and marketer. On the web front, our skilled developer, Kevin McCall, creates beautiful websites for your episodes. Or he'll replace your old site with something that really showcases your work and encourages listeners to discover more. Editing and post-production work are done by me and my colleague Herne Ford-Elliott. Herne also composes intros and outros for podcasts.I also do video work for presentations and social media, as well as voice overs for podcast intros, or fictional narratives.Now, if you're already podcasting, you'll understand the immense value of a podcast as a communications channel. A show done well is one of the best ways to win over potential clients or customers. As an internal communications channel, a podcast show will increase employee engagement and receptivity to key messages.There's a growing catalogue of resources at podmotion dot co. If you have general questions about podcasting, we have a space on Quora, called Podcasting Growth. Post your question there and we'll get back to you. I'll drop the links in the show notes. Future episodes of this show will feature members of the team talking about their work, with expert tips to help you move forward. And after that, we'll cover as much about podcasting as we can. Episodes suggestions are always welcome!So if you're ready to start your podcasting journey, or are looking for a new production and promotional team, head over to podmotion dot co. That's podmotion dot co - and set up your free consultation. Our team has been involved in podcasting for more than 12 years. And collectively we have decades of experience in our specialist areas. Contact us today, and let's move your podcast forward!