The Science of Happiness

PRX and Greater Good Science Center

Learn research-tested strategies for a happier, more meaningful life, drawing on the science of compassion, gratitude, mindfulness, and awe. Hosted by award-winning psychologist Dacher Keltner. Co-produced by PRX and UC Berkeley's Greater Good Science Center.

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Episodes

Happiness Break: A Walking Meditation with Dan Harris of 10% Happier
2d ago
Happiness Break: A Walking Meditation with Dan Harris of 10% Happier
Happiness Break: April 18, 2024 A walking meditation led by 10% Happier Host Dan Harris How to Do This Practice: Begin walking.Bring your awareness to the present moment, noticing sights and sounds around you. When your mind wanders to worries or other thoughts, gently bring yourself back to what you notice around you.See if you can notice the sensations in your leg as you take each step.Continue walking this way as long as you wish. Today’s Happiness Break host: Dan Harris the host of 10% Happier, a podcast about mindfulness and other practices and thoughts that can support our well-being. Check out Dan’s podcast, 10% Happier:  https://tinyurl.com/48cxcbjm\ Order his most recent book, Meditation for Fidgety Skeptics: A 10% Happier How-to Book: https://tinyurl.com/44cmjuvd Follow Dan on Twitter: https://twitter.com/danbharris Follow Dan on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/danharris/ If you enjoyed this Happiness Break, you may also like: Moving Through Space, With Dacher Keltner - https://tinyurl.com/5n8dj5v6 Check out these episodes of The Science of Happiness about walking and mind-body awareness. How To Do Good For The Environment (And Yourself) (Walking, With Diana Gameros) - https://tinyurl.com/3zfhhpus How To Focus Under Pressure (Mindful Body Scan, With Amy Schneider) - https://tinyurl.com/5fkdre2v We love hearing from you! Tell us about your experiences with mindful walking. Email us at happinesspod@berkeley.edu or use the hashtag #happinesspod. Find us on Spotify: https://tinyurl.com/6s39rzus Help us share Happiness Break! Rate us and copy and share this link: https://tinyurl.com/6s39rzus We're living through a mental health crisis. Between the stress, anxiety, depression, loneliness, burnout — we all could use a break to feel better. That's where Happiness Break comes in. In each biweekly podcast episode, instructors guide you through research-backed practices and meditations that you can do in real-time. These relaxing and uplifting practices have been shown in a lab to help you cultivate calm, compassion, connection, mindfulness, and more — what the latest science says will directly support your well-being. All in less than ten minutes. A little break in your day.
How To Make Work More Satisfying
11-04-2024
How To Make Work More Satisfying
Finding ways to bend tasks toward your strengths and passions can make you happier, more productive and find more meaning in your life — no matter your job. Link to episode transcript: https://tinyurl.com/4ky325rs Episode summary: When the poet and former professor Susan Glass first retired, she stacked her days with so many volunteer gigs and passion projects, she felt like she was working harder than ever before. Now, she wants to prioritize living a life of meaning and enjoyment. Susan tried a lab-tested practice called Job Crafting, where you take stock of the tasks that fill your day, how much time and energy they require, what really lights you up, and what changes you can make to better align your efforts at work (or in your free time) with your genuine strengths and passions. Then we hear from researcher Maria Tims about how Job Crafting doesn’t just benefit your own well-being and help to guard against burnout, it can also boost your whole team’s productivity and morale. Practice: Create a “before” sketch: List all your regular tasks, and note each one as low, medium, or high in terms of the time and energy you actually devote to them.Reflect on and write down what motivates you, what your strengths are, and what you’re passionate about.Create a more ideal (but still realistic) "after" diagram, shifting draining tasks from “high” to “low” or “medium” if possible, and boosting energizing and enjoyable tasks where you can.Create an action plan: What are some concrete changes that are in your power to make? Are there places where you need to ask for the support of a colleague or supervisor to make a change? Learn more about this practice at Greater Good In Action: https://ggia.berkeley.edu/practice/job_crafting Today’s guests: Susan Glass is a retired English professor and visually impaired, Bay Area-based poet. She’s the author of the poetry book “The Wild Language of Deer.” Read Susan’s book: https://pod.link/sleep-with-me Learn more about Susan’s life and work: https://tinyurl.com/j3pcjn6r Maria Tims is a professor of Management and Organization at the University of Amsterdam School of Business and Economics. Learn more about her work: https://tinyurl.com/mtp7tpy3 Resources from The Greater Good Science Center: How to Make Life More Meaningful (The Science of Happiness Podcast) https://tinyurl.com/39pth57f How to Be More Engaged at Work: https://tinyurl.com/2s3t5x2c How Oxytocin Can Make Your Job More Meaningful: https://tinyurl.com/mrx8458h Four Keys to a Healthy Workplace Hierarchy: https://tinyurl.com/788m6tme More Resources for Improving the Job You Have: HBR - What Job Crafting Looks Like: https://tinyurl.com/453yamac LSE - Can workers really craft their own happiness in the job? https://tinyurl.com/yjavhda9 TED - The Power of Personalising Our Work: https://tinyurl.com/4cvznn8v Tell us about your experiences finding meaning in your day-to-day tasks. Email us at happinesspod@berkeley.edu or use the hashtag #happinesspod. Help us share The Science of Happiness! Leave us a 5-star review and share this link with someone who might like the show: https://tinyurl.com/2p9h5aap
Happiness Break: A Meditation To Move Through Anger, With Eve Ekman
04-04-2024
Happiness Break: A Meditation To Move Through Anger, With Eve Ekman
Accepting difficult feelings like anger or irritation can help us keep our cool, feel better overall, and find calm on the other side. Link to episode transcript: https://tinyurl.com/n6hm5yhz How to Do This Practice: Begin the practice by settling your mind and body. Notice your breath and any sensations that arise in your body,Shift your attention away from your body, recalling an instance where you felt mildly irritated or frustrated. Give yourself a few moments to fully feel this emotion. Notice any physical sensations that arise. Then, release that memory, refocusing your attention on the body. Allow these sensations to shift and move, giving them the space to change and observing them with a sense of curiosity and kindness.Consider shaking hands with the emotion the next time it arises in your daily life. Today’s Happiness Break host: Eve Ekman is a contemplative social scientist and meditation teacher from San Francisco, California. Learn more about Eve’s work: https://tinyurl.com/2vhuarh8 Find out about Eve’s Emotional trainings with Cultivating Emotional Balance: https://tinyurl.com/5n95m7yx Explore Eve’s Project, The Atlas of Emotions: https://tinyurl.com/mt75ytm3 Follow Eve on Facebook: https://tinyurl.com/3txahape More resources from The Greater Good Science Center: How to Regulate Your Emotions Without Suppressing Them: https://tinyurl.com/4x29denx What to Do When You Feel Stuck in Negative Emotions: https://tinyurl.com/mwczxfya How to Turn Your Brain from Anger to Compassion: https://tinyurl.com/57upkcfa How to Overcome Destructive Anger: https://tinyurl.com/49zu6whw We love hearing from you! How do you manage your emotions? Email us at happinesspod@berkeley.edu or use the hashtag #happinesspod. Find us on Spotify: https://tinyurl.com/6s39rzus Help us share Happiness Break! Rate us and copy and share this link: https://tinyurl.com/6s39rzus We're living through a mental health crisis. Between the stress, anxiety, depression, loneliness, burnout — we all could use a break to feel better. That's where Happiness Break comes in. In each biweekly podcast episode, instructors guide you through research-backed practices and meditations that you can do in real-time. These relaxing and uplifting practices have been shown in a lab to help you cultivate calm, compassion, connection, mindfulness, and more — what the latest science says will directly support your well-being. All in less than ten minutes. A little break in your day.
How To Talk To People You Disagree With
28-03-2024
How To Talk To People You Disagree With
We learn techniques for working across the aisle without compromising our values from a Democratic politician in one of the most conservative states, Oklahoma. Link to episode transcript: https://tinyurl.com/w2a9a42p Episode summary: Trying to have a conversation with someone who has an opposing view can be exhausting. This week, we explore what it means to have productive discussions when we disagree. Democratic Oklahoma State Senator Jo Anna Dossett recounts her experience bridging political divides with Republican senators in her state with  active listening and self-compassion. Later, we hear from political science professor Lilliana Mason about the blurred line between personal and political identities, and how connecting with individuals on an emotional and social level can lead to more fruitful discussions than just focusing on facts. Today’s guests: Jo Anna Dossett is an Oklahoma State Senator. Learn about Jo Anna Dossett: https://tinyurl.com/muxw7yvz Follow Jo Anna Dossett on Twitter: https://twitter.com/dossett4ok Follow Jo Anna Dossett on Instagram: https://tinyurl.com/293n98fc Follow Jo Anna Dossett on Facebook: https://tinyurl.com/yc3mszhx Lilliana Mason is a political science professor at Johns Hopkins University. Learn about Lilliana Mason’s work: https://tinyurl.com/w2hy6fhk Follow Lilliana Mason on Twitter: https://tinyurl.com/29sumyxb Resources from The Greater Good Science Center: Eight Keys to Bridging Our Differences: https://tinyurl.com/45ntehyp Four Lessons From Mediators for Bridging Differences: https://tinyurl.com/bdhf68te What Will It Take to Bridge Our Differences? https://tinyurl.com/3sua8uz5 Six Techniques to Help You Bridge Differences: https://tinyurl.com/ypsbycf4 15 Practices to Help Kids Bridge Differences: https://tinyurl.com/mvw4s649 More Resources on Bridging Differences TIME - How Americans Can Tackle Political Division Together: https://tinyurl.com/3phj6y7j APA - Healing the political divide: https://tinyurl.com/38kzvm5k BBC - Crossing Divides: What the research tells us: https://tinyurl.com/yahmwdth Stanford - How to Bridge Political Divides: https://tinyurl.com/yc7ha55p Tell us about your experiences and struggles bridging differences. Email us at happinesspod@berkeley.edu or use the hashtag #happinesspod. Help us share The Science of Happiness! Rate us on Spotify and share this link with someone who might like the show: https://tinyurl.com/d3mc7e6t
Happiness Break: Tap into the Joy that Surrounds You, With Anushka Fernandopulle
21-03-2024
Happiness Break: Tap into the Joy that Surrounds You, With Anushka Fernandopulle
Beyond just feeling good, studies show experiencing other people's joy makes us more compassionate and satisfied with life. Link to episode transcript: https://tinyurl.com/43e35j37 How to Do This Practice: Find a comfortable position to begin this practice, focusing on your breath.Visualize a person or situation that brings you a sense of joy or happiness. It might be a child laughing, the success of a friend, or even a dog wagging its tail.Connect with their joy and happiness, wishing them well.Expand your focus to larger groups of people, like a team winning a match, wishing them well.Consider repeating this practice when you want to connect your sense of happiness with others. Today’s Happiness Break host: Anushka Fernandopulle is a Buddhist meditation teacher and leadership coach.  Learn More about Anushka: https://www.anushkaf.org/about/ Follow Anushka on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/anushka_dharma/ Follow Anushka on Twitter: https://twitter.com/anushkaf More resources from The Greater Good Science Center: Happiness Break: Wishing Others’ Well, With Anushka Fernandopulle: https://tinyurl.com/jrkewjs8 What Is Sympathetic Joy and How Can You Feel More of It? https://tinyurl.com/yuzmykct How to Overcome Stress by Seeing Other People’s Joy: https://tinyurl.com/4csukyd5 Can Little Steps Lead to Big Joy? https://tinyurl.com/3e5yt3hp Why Experiencing Joy and Pain in a Group Is So Powerful: https://tinyurl.com/3trjtzfm We love hearing from you! Tell us about your experience of appreciating others’ joy. Email us at happinesspod@berkeley.edu or use the hashtag #happinesspod. Find us on Spotify: https://tinyurl.com/3bj4637f Help us share Happiness Break! Leave us a 5-star review and copy and share this link: https://tinyurl.com/2p9h5aap We're living through a mental health crisis. Between the stress, anxiety, depression, loneliness, burnout — we all could use a break to feel better. That's where Happiness Break comes in. In each biweekly podcast episode, instructors guide you through research-backed practices and meditations that you can do in real-time. These relaxing and uplifting practices have been shown in a lab to help you cultivate calm, compassion, connection, mindfulness, and more — what the latest science says will directly support your well-being. All in less than ten minutes. A little break in your day.
Who’s Always There for You?
14-03-2024
Who’s Always There for You?
When we remember the times someone had our back, it changes the way we view ourselves and the world. Our guest explores what happens when trying a practice to feel more supported. Link to episode transcript: https://tinyurl.com/mrpyr8a7 Episode summary: Ever since he was a young child, José Valladares has spent his life caring for others and has taken pride in supporting his family and community, For our show, he tried a practice where he recalled people in his life who he can turn to during a difficult moment — the people who support him. As he wrote about their admirable qualities and specific instances where they helped him, José felt a renewed sense of gratitude and energy to persist forward in helping others. Later, we hear from psychologist Angela Rowe about how feeling supported can impact our relationships and sense of personal empowerment. Practice: Make a list of the people who offer you comfort or security.Write down six positive qualities that are common to some or all of these people.Next, recall and visualize a specific situation when you felt distressed or worried, and one of these people comforted and helped you.Write a brief description of that situation and how you felt during it. Learn more about this practice at Greater Good In Action: https://ggia.berkeley.edu/practice/feeling_supported Today’s guests: José Valladares is a software engineer in Utah originally from Honduras. Angela Rowe is a psychology professor at the University of Bristol. Learn more about Angela’s work: https://tinyurl.com/4nh752ad Resources from The Greater Good Science Center: Happiness Break: Who Takes Care of You? With Dacher Keltner: https://tinyurl.com/bdezwwyd How to Let Someone Love You (The Science of Happiness Podcast): https://tinyurl.com/5xtzbzj2 Four Ways Social Support Makes You More Resilient: https://tinyurl.com/2p9zkjpj Just One Thing: Feel the Support: https://tinyurl.com/yrfnmwfv Friend or Family? https://tinyurl.com/msbs2kuh More Resources on Feeling Supported NYT Times - Are You Anxious, Avoidant or Secure? https://tinyurl.com/yes746sv The Atlantic - The Trait That ‘Super Friends’ Have in Common: https://tinyurl.com/bdheumdh BBC - Why friendship makes us healthier: https://tinyurl.com/3596n4u7 TED - How to ask for help -- and get a "yes": https://tinyurl.com/2ybrmt7m Stanford - Asking for help is hard, but people want to help more than we realize, Stanford scholar says’: https://tinyurl.com/4n4hraj5' Who do you turn to for support in your life? Email us at happinesspod@berkeley.edu or use the hashtag #happinesspod. Help us share The Science of Happiness! Rate us on Spotify and share this link with someone who might like the show: https://tinyurl.com/b6779syt
Happiness Break: Where Did You Come From? Guided Writing With Lyla June
07-03-2024
Happiness Break: Where Did You Come From? Guided Writing With Lyla June
Indigenous artist Lyla June leads a 5-minute freewriting exercise about our personal journeys. Autobiographical writing has been shown to help do better in relationships and feel more satisfied in life. Link to episode transcript: https://tinyurl.com/3622n5s6 How to Do This Practice: You will need writing utensils for this practice. Find a comfortable place to start this writing practice, taking a few moments to ground yourself.Write the prompt, “I come from a place where…” For the next 5 minutes (or more), write whatever comes to mind, allowing your thoughts and ideas to flow freely, without judgment or filters. Trying keeping your pen to the paper the whole time. Take some time afterward to read and reflect on what you wrote. Consider repeating this exercise every few weeks or months to reflect on your past and prospective future.  Today’s Happiness Break host: Lyla June is an Indigenous artist and scholar from the Diné Nation. Learn about Lyla June’s work: [https://www.lylajune.com/>\ Watch Lyla June’s videos: [https://tinyurl.com/bdhbwyru>\ Follow Lyla June on Twitter: [https://tinyurl.com/4pj565d6>\ Follow Lyla June on Instagram: https://tinyurl.com/4pj565d6 More resources from The Greater Good Science Center: The Power of Expressing Your Deepest Emotions (The Science of Happiness Podcast): [https://tinyurl.com/2uzh3r67>\ How to Journal Through Your Struggles: [https://tinyurl.com/yua6wkwd>\ How Journaling Can Help You in Hard Times: [https://tinyurl.com/3zv3hunw>\ How Creative Writing Can Increase Students’ Resilience: https://tinyurl.com/4xw8xuff How was your experience with this freewriting exercise? Email us at happinesspod@berkeley.edu or use the hashtag #happinesspod. Find us on Spotify: https://tinyurl.com/ycukc4za Help us share Happiness Break! Leave us a 5-star review and copy and share this link: https://tinyurl.com/2p9h5aap We're living through a mental health crisis. Between the stress, anxiety, depression, loneliness, burnout — we all could use a break to feel better. That's where Happiness Break comes in. In each biweekly podcast episode, instructors guide you through research-backed practices and meditations that you can do in real-time. These relaxing and uplifting practices have been shown in a lab to help you cultivate calm, compassion, connection, mindfulness, and more — what the latest science says will directly support your well-being. All in less than ten minutes. A little break in your day.
Why Grownups Should Be Playful Too
29-02-2024
Why Grownups Should Be Playful Too
Playfulness can improve your relationships, help you excel at work, and reduce stress. We explore a strategy shown to help you become more playful. Link to episode transcript: http://tinyurl.com/b5xc78r3 Episode summary: Patricia Mebrahtu used to have so much fun as a child. Now, as a medical assistant and mother of two young children, she found herself feeling burnt out and irritable. For our show, Patricia tried a practice to infuse more playfulness into her life. From singing karaoke with her family to playing in the rain, she tapped into her inner child. Through this practice, Patricia recognized the importance of taking time out for yourself, and that she can carve out opportunities to have fun and be playful, even as a busy adult. Later, we hear from psychologist René Proyer about the different types of playfulness, and how incorporating play can benefit our sense of wellbeing. Practice: Each day for a week, incorporate one playful activity into your routine – it can be anything you find enjoyable and playful.Every evening, write about the experience, and how it made you feel in the present moment. Today’s guests: Patricia Mebrahtu is a mother and medical assistant in California. René Proyer is a psychologist from the Martin-Luther University Halle-Wittenberg. Learn about René’s work: http://tinyurl.com/4sa9vye9 Follow René on Twitter: http://tinyurl.com/3x5986u6 Resources from The Greater Good Science Center: Can We Play? http://tinyurl.com/prhv22rf What Playfulness Can Do for Your Relationship: http://tinyurl.com/n9b3h7e4 Tuesday Tip: Play with Some Friends: http://tinyurl.com/mu837nwr More Resources on Being Playful: BBC - Playtime: Is it time we took 'play' more seriously? http://tinyurl.com/4jmx89vn NYT - Why We All Need to Have More Fun: http://tinyurl.com/335z4bdu Washington Post - Why it’s good for grown-ups to go play: http://tinyurl.com/5w8shen TED - The Importance of PLAY in adulthood and childhood: http://tinyurl.com/4hsn9um4 How do you incorporate play into your life? Email us at happinesspod@berkeley.edu or use the hashtag #happinesspod. Help us share The Science of Happiness! Rate us on Spotify and share this link with someone who might like the show: http://tinyurl.com/up29j8zk
Happiness Break: A Meditation on Playfulness, With Dacher Keltner
22-02-2024
Happiness Break: A Meditation on Playfulness, With Dacher Keltner
We all have a playful side, and research shows acting on it can help us when we need to move through challenging emotions, manage conflict, and be more creative. Link to episode transcript: http://tinyurl.com/4bxtn9ek How to Do This Practice: Find a comfortable position to begin the practice. Focus on breathing deeply.Think back to a moment of play during your childhood. Recall specific details like your age, what you were doing and who you were with. As you remember, notice how the memory is affecting you in the present moment.Next, focus on a recent memory of play – maybe with your partner, friends, or family. Fully recall the moment, again bringing to mind specific details. Notice how this memory makes you feel.Take note of how reflecting on play has affected your breathing. Did it affect the tight areas in your body? How about the relaxed and open ones?As you refocus your attention on your breath, make a commitment to add play into your busy schedule going forward. Today’s Happiness Break host: Dacher Keltner is the host of the Greater Good Science Center’s award-winning podcast, The Science of Happiness and is a co-instructor of the GGSC’s popular online course of the same name. He’s also the founding director of the Greater Good Science Center and a professor of psychology at the University of California, Berkeley. Check out Dacher’s most recent book, *Awe: The New Science of Everyday Wonder and How It Can Transform Your Life: *https://tinyurl.com/4j4hcvyt\](https://tinyurl.com/4j4hcvyt) More resources from The Greater Good Science Center: What Happens When We Play (The Science of Happiness Podcast): http://tinyurl.com/mrfm5pj5 Can We Play? http://tinyurl.com/prhv22rf What Playfulness Can Do for Your Relationship: http://tinyurl.com/n9b3h7e4 For Black Children, Play Can Be Transformative: http://tinyurl.com/mwnfcu26 What memories of play came to your mind? Email us at happinesspod@berkeley.edu or use the hashtag #happinesspod. Find us on Spotify: http://tinyurl.com/ycydhyxz Help us share Happiness Break! Rate us and copy and share this link: http://tinyurl.com/ycydhyxz We're living through a mental health crisis. Between the stress, anxiety, depression, loneliness, burnout — we all could use a break to feel better. That's where Happiness Break comes in. In each biweekly podcast episode, instructors guide you through research-backed practices and meditations that you can do in real-time. These relaxing and uplifting practices have been shown in a lab to help you cultivate calm, compassion, connection, mindfulness, and more — what the latest science says will directly support your well-being. All in less than ten minutes. A little break in your day.
Encore: How to Feel Less Pressed for Time
15-02-2024
Encore: How to Feel Less Pressed for Time
When we devote a little time to the other people in our life, we actually feel like we have more of it. Our guest tried a practice to regain control of his time and schedule Link to episode transcript: http://tinyurl.com/mr3r6jfn Episode summary: Like many of us, our guest Bryant Terry felt like he never had enough time in his day. And while he was eager to reconnect with his family, his schedule was spiraling out of control. For our show, Bryant tried a practice proven to help you feel like you have more time, by specifically devoting some of your time to others. He set intentions to spend quality time with his children doing activities that they truly enjoy. By prioritizing those special moments with his family, Bryant felt more control over his schedule, recognizing that he has the power to make time for what truly matters to him. Later, we hear from professor Cassie Mogilner Holmes about why this practice works, and how being intentional with our time can reshape our relationship with it.  Learn more about this practice at Greater Good In Action: https://ggia.berkeley.edu/practice/gift_of_time Practice Think of a person whom you care about. What might you be able to do for this person that entails nothing more than the giving of your time? Plan a gift of time for this person and give it, whether it means doing something with them (in person or virtually). Spend as much time as needed to do the favor well and do not take any shortcuts. You might even consider taking off your watch or putting your smartphone away.  Today’s guests: Bryant Terry is an award winning chef, author and artist.  Learn about Bryant’s work: http://tinyurl.com/3wf3264h Follow Bryant on Instagram: http://tinyurl.com/2w68z8bc Learn about his imprint, 4 Color Books: http://tinyurl.com/yuhrsrp8 Cassie Mogilner Holmes is a professor of marketing and behavioral decision making at UCLA.  Learn about Cassie’s work: http://tinyurl.com/rb5r97s5 Resources from The Greater Good Science Center: How to Feel Like You Have More Time: http://tinyurl.com/p6ykm7y2 Ten Ways to Make Your Time Matter: http://tinyurl.com/34dvwnv4 Why You Never Seem to Have Enough Time: http://tinyurl.com/4t8vyhy3 Can Awe Buy You More Time and Happiness? http://tinyurl.com/m28d8wcx How to Spend Your Time on What Matters Most: http://tinyurl.com/ycw527tj More Resources on spending quality time with others: BBC - How to feel more in control of your time: http://tinyurl.com/nhbt7btm Stanford - Jennifer Aaker: How to Feel Like You Have More Time: http://tinyurl.com/n8cc6yfk Harvard -You’ll Feel Less Rushed If You Give Time Away:  http://tinyurl.com/yc86ymve How do you devote time to others? Email us at happinesspod@berkeley.edu or use the hashtag #happinesspod. Help us share The Science of Happiness! Rate us on Spotify and share this link with someone who might like the show: http://tinyurl.com/yjdesnze
Happiness Break: Wrap Yourself in Kindness, With Jack Kornfield
08-02-2024
Happiness Break: Wrap Yourself in Kindness, With Jack Kornfield
When we treat ourselves with kindness and gratitude, research shows we feel more motivated and less self-critical. Meditation teacher Jack Kornfield leads in a practice where we gently turn inward. Link to episode transcript: http://tinyurl.com/yfbz28h2 How to Do This Practice: Find a comfortable position to begin the practice. Focus on taking deep breaths, relaxing your body.As you recognize the different sensations in your body, consciously envelope yourself in kindness. Thank your body for providing and caring for you.Redirect your loving kindness towards your heart and the varied emotions it carries.Thank your heart for all it does for you. Then, focus your kindness towards your mind and all the thoughts and worries it holds. Thank it for all that it does.Next, turn towards your consciousness as a whole – your emotions, body, thoughts. Rest in a state of comfortable, loving-kindness.When you’re ready, gently open your eyes and reconnect with the world around you. Today’s Happiness Break host: Jack Kornfield is a meditation teacher and author who is one of the leading voices to share Buddhist teachings with a Western audiences. Learn more about Jack’s work: http://tinyurl.com/2wfth7v2 Follow Jack on Instagram: http://tinyurl.com/3zs2bjvx Follow Jack on Twitter: http://tinyurl.com/bd5r9k4a Follow Jack on Facebook: http://tinyurl.com/mryr839y More resources from The Greater Good Science Center: Take Our Self-Compassion Quiz: https://tinyurl.com/yysrf663 How to Bring Self-Compassion to Work with You: https://tinyurl.com/45zkrkam The Five Myths of Self-Compassion: https://tinyurl.com/2p88vass How Gratitude Changes You and Your Brain: http://tinyurl.com/2f78cywf Is Gratitude Good for Your Health? http://tinyurl.com/yc86ve9d We love hearing from you! Tell us about your experience of gratitude and self-compassion. Email us at happinesspod@berkeley.edu or use the hashtag #happinesspod. Find us on Spotify: https://tinyurl.com/6s39rzus Help us share Happiness Break! Rate us and copy and share this link: https://tinyurl.com/6s39rzus We’re living through a mental health crisis. Between the stress, anxiety, depression, loneliness, burnout — we all could use a break to feel better. That’s where Happiness Break comes in. In each biweekly podcast episode, instructors guide you through research-backed practices and meditations that you can do in real-time. These relaxing and uplifting practices have been shown in a lab to help you cultivate calm, compassion, connection, mindfulness, and more — what the latest science says will directly support your well-being. All in less than ten minutes. A little break in your day.
What To Do When You Don’t Like The Way You Feel
01-02-2024
What To Do When You Don’t Like The Way You Feel
Our guest tried a practice in Radical Acceptance, a Buddhist principle made popular by today's expert, psychologist Tara Brach.  Link to episode transcript: http://tinyurl.com/362m4n3b Episode summary: Sometimes, a setback in work or life can leave us feeling defeated and uninspired. Nadia Zafar is a neurobiology student who has been pursuing her PhD for the last 6 years. Recently, her lack of progress had her spiraling in thoughts of self-doubt and unworthiness. For our show, Nadia tried a practice rooted in radical acceptance, called RAIN. By actively recognizing emotions without judgment, investigating them further, and then nurturing those sensations, she started to approach her negative and anxious thoughts from a place of self-compassion instead of blame. Later, we speak with the creator of the RAIN practice, Tara Brach. She explains the elements of the practice that make it so effective, how approaching situations from a place of acceptance helps disrupt our reactive instincts — opening up more space for awareness and compassion for ourselves and others. Practice: When you come up against something challenging – you’re angry or frustrated or feeling any way about yourself, another person, or a situation – move through these steps. It might be helpful to sit somewhere you feel comfortable. Close your eyes for a few moments, and begin by taking a few deep, intentional breaths, to help settle the mind. Recognize what’s happening. For example, “I am getting caught up in anger right now.”Allow the emotion you recognize to be there: Accept that you are feeling the way you’re feeling. You may go a step further and forgive yourself for it, for example by saying to yourself, “Anger forgiven.”Investigate what’s underneath whatever you’re feeling by directing a gentle curiosity towards it. For example, where there is anger, there is something we care deeply about.Nurture: You might put your hand on your heart, remind yourself that many have struggled with the very thing you’re struggling with now, and send yourself a message of kindness and understanding. Today’s guests: Nadia Zafar is a 6th year neurobiology PhD student at the University of Toronto. Tara Brach is a leading voice in the field of contemplative meditation practices. Learn more about Tara and her work: https://www.tarabrach.com/ Read Tara’s book, Radical Acceptance: Embracing Your Life With the Heart of a Buddha:  http://tinyurl.com/4csarvmf Follow Tara on Facebook: http://tinyurl.com/3arhy4uh Follow Tara on Twitter: http://tinyurl.com/2drpvp6c Follow Tara on Instagram: http://tinyurl.com/y743bkru Resources from The Greater Good Science Center: Happiness Break: Radical Acceptance, With Tara Brach (The Science of Happiness Podcast): http://tinyurl.com/msf5ccde Can Self-Awareness Help You Be More Empathic? http://tinyurl.com/5yh8z2s2 How Does Mindfulness Help Cultivate Self-Compassion? http://tinyurl.com/yuhwmja4 How to Bring Self-Compassion to Work with You: http://tinyurl.com/2a3mm6pf Want to Change Your Life? Try Self-Compassion: http://tinyurl.com/2y2ryc6m More Resources on Radical Acceptance: Harvard - Greater self-acceptance improves emotional well-being: http://tinyurl.com/2ty58cbh BBC - Why self-compassion – not self-esteem – leads to success: http://tinyurl.com/yj2zax8x Ted - Dare to rewire your brain for self-compassion: http://tinyurl.com/yc2ru73p Tell us about your experiences and struggles with accepting difficult situations. Email us at happinesspod@berkeley.edu or use the hashtag #happinesspod. Help us share The Science of Happiness! Rate us on Spotify and share this link with someone who might like the show: http://tinyurl.com/v6j42zu7
Happiness Break: Radical Acceptance, With Tara Brach
25-01-2024
Happiness Break: Radical Acceptance, With Tara Brach
A meditation in meeting our most difficult emotions — like anger, disappointment, or fear — with mindfulness and gentle care. Link to episode transcript: http://tinyurl.com/48jas955 How to Do This Practice: When you come up against something challenging – you’re angry or frustrated or feeling any way about yourself, another person, or a situation, move through these steps. It might be helpful to sit somewhere you feel comfortable closing your eyes for a few moments, and begin by taking a few deep, intentional breaths, to help settle the mind. Recognize what’s happening. For example, “I am getting caught up in anger right now.”Allow the emotion you recognize to be there: Accept that you are feeling the way you’re feeling. You may go a step further and forgive yourself for it, for example by saying to yourself, “Anger forgiven.”Investigate what’s underneath whatever you’re feeling by directing a gentle curiosity towards it. For example, where there is anger, there is something we care deeply about.Nurture: Send yourself a message of kindness. You might put your hand on your heart, for example, and remind yourself that everyone experiences reactivity, and send yourself a message of kindness and understanding. Today’s Happiness Break host: Tara Brach is a psychologist and leading voice in contemporary meditative practices and the author of numerous popular books on contemplative practice. Read Tara’s seminal book, Radical Acceptance: Embracing Your Life With the Heart of the Buddha: http://tinyurl.com/4csarvmf Learn more about Tara’s work: https://www.tarabrach.com/ Find classes taught by Dr. Neff: https://www.tarabrach.com/online-courses/ Follow Tara on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/tarabrach/ Follow Tara on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/tarabrach More resources from The Greater Good Science Center: How to Go Through Life with Love in Your Heart, A Q&A with Tara Brach: http://tinyurl.com/2ne65wed The Mindfulness Skill That Is Crucial for Stress: http://tinyurl.com/3xmnekw2 How Self-Compassion Beats Rumination: http://tinyurl.com/yc7phxsc Want to Change Your Life? Try Self-Compassion: http://tinyurl.com/2y2ryc6m Overcoming Objections to Self-Compassion: http://tinyurl.com/yc2wvusr Self-Compassion Could Help You Be More Tolerant of Others: http://tinyurl.com/3kwrm88h We love hearing from you! Tell us about your experience with the Light RAIN practice. Email us at happinesspod@berkeley.edu or use the hashtag #happinesspod. Find us on Spotify: https://tinyurl.com/6s39rzus Help us share Happiness Break! Rate us and copy and share this link: https://tinyurl.com/6s39rzus We're living through a mental health crisis. Between the stress, anxiety, depression, loneliness, burnout — we all could use a break to feel better. That's where Happiness Break comes in. In each biweekly podcast episode, instructors guide you through research-backed practices and meditations that you can do in real-time. These relaxing and uplifting practices have been shown in a lab to help you cultivate calm, compassion, connection, mindfulness, and more — what the latest science says will directly support your well-being. All in less than ten minutes. A little break in your day.
How (And Why) To Find More Beauty in the Everyday
18-01-2024
How (And Why) To Find More Beauty in the Everyday
What happens when we intentionally look for beautiful things in our day-to-day lives? We explore a lab-tested practice shown to help you feel happier. Link to Transcript: http://tinyurl.com/yretvrkp Episode summary: When was the last time you witnessed a beautiful moment? Maybe it was a striking sunset, a kind exchange between strangers, or a hearty laugh between two friends. Beautiful moments surround us, and research suggests that taking the time to admire them can actually benefit our health and happiness. For our show, restorative justice advocate Darnell Washington looked for 9 beautiful things each day and reflected on them. In doing so, he recognized how admiring different types of beauty from nature to the goodness of others, can have a powerful impact on his own humanity. Later, we hear from the psychologist who created the practice, René T. Proyer, about how making it a point to notice different kinds of beauty benefits our happiness and reduces depression. Practice: Every night for at least one week, set about 15 minutes before going to bed to think about nine beautiful things that happened during the day, 3 each in the following categories.Write down three beautiful things in human behavior (morally, positively valued behavior, ie good deeds).Write down three things you experienced as beautiful in nature and/or the environment.Write down three beautiful things in general that you noticed during the day  (referring to aesthetics, like art, music, architecture, etc).Note why you found each of these nine things beautiful. Today’s guests: Darnell Washington is a formerly incarcerated restorative justice advocate from California. Listen to Darnell’s Ted Talk: http://tinyurl.com/cujz79fk René T. Proyer is a professor and researcher at Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg. Learn about René’s work: http://tinyurl.com/4sa9vye9 Follow René on Twitter: http://tinyurl.com/3x5986u6 Resources from The Greater Good Science Center: Finding Beauty in the Everyday (The Science of Happiness Podcast): http://tinyurl.com/2w2ht55h Why Seeing Beauty Matters, Even in the Midst of War: http://tinyurl.com/4zy436xk How Nature Can Make You Kinder, Happier, and More Creative: http://tinyurl.com/d2vzpsaj Finding Awe in the Ordinary: http://tinyurl.com/aavr2pkv More Resources on Appreciating Beauty: BBC - The neuroscience of beauty: What your brain finds beautiful – and how this shapes your thoughts: http://tinyurl.com/47s6zcre TED - Nature. Beauty. Gratitude: http://tinyurl.com/upnrzthc CNN - It’s the little things: Why animals, sunsets and coffee make us happy: http://tinyurl.com/yckephaf We want to hear from you! What beautiful moment have you noticed recently? Email us at happinesspod@berkeley.edu or use the hashtag #happinesspod. Help us share The Science of Happiness! Rete us and share this link with someone who might like the show: http://tinyurl.com/yfsx9zwp
Happiness Break: A Meditation to Find Grounding in the New Year, With Spring Washam
11-01-2024
Happiness Break: A Meditation to Find Grounding in the New Year, With Spring Washam
Research shows feeling connected with nature can lower our stress response. This visualization meditation can help you feel at ease, no matter where you are. Link to episode transcript: http://tinyurl.com/2k6pdh7n How to Do This Practice: It is encouraged to try this practice outdoors Begin the practice by focusing on your breath, and relaxing your body, noticing how it feels supported, particularly by the earth.Allow yourself to let go of anything you are mentally or emotionally carrying, visualizing it going into the earth, letting the ground continue to support you.Draw on imagery from nature to cultivate feelings of strength and sturdiness to support you. For example, imagine that your own body is rooting into the earth to become as unshakable as a tree,   imagine that you are as steady as a mountain, your breath is the breeze and your mind is as open and boundless as the sky.End the practice by placing your hand on your heart, offering yourself kindness, well-being and joy. Today’s Happiness Break host: Spring Washam is an author and meditation teacher based in Oakland, California. Learn more about Spring’s work: http://tinyurl.com/3bbshnn7 Read Spring’s books here: http://tinyurl.com/4hkft4js More resources from The Greater Good Science Center: Happiness Break: What To Do When You’re Struggling, With Spring Washam: http://tinyurl.com/mrx8t9st What Happens When We Reconnect With Nature: http://tinyurl.com/553xwm47 Why Is Nature So Good for Your Mental Health? http://tinyurl.com/ycx9ns4p How Nature Helps Us Heal: http://tinyurl.com/2p93682j Why You Need More Nature in Your Life: http://tinyurl.com/28z27wb2 We love hearing from you! How do you connect with nature? Email us at happinesspod@berkeley.edu or use the hashtag #happinesspod. Find us on Spotify: https://tinyurl.com/6s39rzus Help us share Happiness Break! Rate us and copy and share this link: https://tinyurl.com/6s39rzus We're living through a mental health crisis. Between the stress, anxiety, depression, loneliness, burnout — we all could use a break to feel better. That's where Happiness Break comes in. In each biweekly podcast episode, instructors guide you through research-backed practices and meditations that you can do in real-time. These relaxing and uplifting practices have been shown in a lab to help you cultivate calm, compassion, connection, mindfulness, and more — what the latest science says will directly support your well-being. All in less than ten minutes. A little break in your day.
How to Stick to Your Resolutions in 2024
04-01-2024
How to Stick to Your Resolutions in 2024
Join our limited newsletter The Science of Habits to get curated, science-backed tips to help make your New Years resolution stick in 2024. https://ggsc.berkeley.edu/podcasts/habits We explore how the science of behavior change can help us form new habits and be happier while doing it.Link to episode transcript: http://tinyurl.com/4e294mdt Episode summary: Many of us are heading into the new year with a resolution we want to live by — a new good habit we’d like to form. But actually sticking to those good habits isn’t always easy — one failure can have us losing the motivation to continue. For our show, we spoke with Cholpon Ramizova and Derick Gnonlonfoun, a couple who set out to create better food habits by cooking at home more and incorporating more vegetables into their meals. As they started to develop this new habit, the two realized that a mindful and kind attitude towards themselves was a key element to their success. Later, we hear from psychologists Katy Milkman and Kristin Neff, to learn about how failure can actually be beneficial when pursuing a goal, and how to cope with it. Today’s guests: Cholpon Ramizova and Derick Gnonlonfoun are a couple living in London. Check out Derick’s artwork here: http://tinyurl.com/2kc9h478 Katy Milkman is a professor at The Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania and the Co-Director of The Behavior Change for Good Initiative. Learn more about Katy and her work: http://tinyurl.com/4ypvmvhf Find more information on the Behavior Change for Good Initiative: http://tinyurl.com/mr94wh6f Follow Katy on Twitter: http://tinyurl.com/mr25etdp Resources from The Greater Good Science Center: How to Make New Year’s Resolutions That Feel Good: http://tinyurl.com/3bvs8zb5 Make Self-Compassion One of Your New Year’s Resolutions: http://tinyurl.com/yc2t42nt Tips for Keeping New Year’s Resolutions: http://tinyurl.com/y2pt9uz2 How to Learn From Your Failures: http://tinyurl.com/5h7uybux More Resources on Forming Good Habits: BBC - 4 simple, science-backed ways to build habits that stick: http://tinyurl.com/2p8dk6wt Harvard -What Does It Really Take to Build a New Habit?  http://tinyurl.com/ndrfybyb Stanford - Building Habits: The Key to Lasting Behavior Change: http://tinyurl.com/4utw95sj TED - The 1-minute secret to forming a new habit: http://tinyurl.com/mum8kzvj Help us share The Science of Happiness! Rate us on Spotify and share this link with someone who might like the show: http://tinyurl.com/2pxdw8vr
Happiness Break: Visualizing Your Best Self in Relationships, With Dacher Keltner
28-12-2023
Happiness Break: Visualizing Your Best Self in Relationships, With Dacher Keltner
When we imagine our best possible selves in our relationships, we feel more motivated to achieve our goals and a greater sense of control over our lives. This week, Dacher leads a visualization exercise in preparation for the new year. Join our limited newsletter The Science of Habits to get curated, science-backed tips to help make your New Years resolution stick in 2024. https://ggsc.berkeley.edu/podcasts/habits Link to episode transcript: http://tinyurl.com/yj43srye How to Do This Practice: Find a comfortable place to begin the practice. Take deep breaths.Focus on the person you are in a romantic relationship with, or a dear friend. Bring an image of them to mind, like how they look and their mannerisms.Imagine your life in the future, and how you would like to be the best version of yourself in your relationship with them. Picture yourself interacting with them — what is happening? What are you doing and saying? What is the tone of the interaction?Repeat this exercise by focusing on friendships and familial relationships. Take note of any common actions across all relationships that you would like to take. Set an intention about how you will interact within your relationships in the new year.When you’re done, reground yourself in the present moment, focusing on the sensations in your body.  Today’s Happiness Break host: Dacher Keltner is the host of the award-winning podcast, The Science of Happiness and is a co-instructor of the GGSC’s popular online course of the same name. He’s also the founding director of the Greater Good Science Center and a professor of psychology at the UC, Berkeley. Check out Dacher’s most recent book, Awe: The New Science of Everyday Wonder and How It Can Transform Your Life: https://tinyurl.com/4j4hcvyt More resources from The Greater Good Science Center: How to Find Your Best Possible Self (The Science of Happiness Podcast): https://tinyurl.com/265b34pj How Thinking About the Future Makes Life More Meaningful: https://tinyurl.com/24mex4by 10 Pillars of a Strong Relationship:https://tinyurl.com/3zffc8x4 For the New Year, Try Imagining Your Best Possible Life: https://tinyurl.com/4carr6kv We love hearing from you! How do you plan to be your best possible self in the new year? Email us at happinesspod@berkeley.edu or use the hashtag #happinesspod. Find us on Spotify: https://tinyurl.com/6s39rzus Help us share Happiness Break! Rate us and copy and share this link: https://tinyurl.com/6s39rzus We're living through a mental health crisis. Between the stress, anxiety, depression, loneliness, burnout — we all could use a break to feel better. That's where Happiness Break comes in. In each biweekly podcast episode, instructors guide you through research-backed practices and meditations that you can do in real-time. These relaxing and uplifting practices have been shown in a lab to help you cultivate calm, compassion, connection, mindfulness, and more — what the latest science says will directly support your well-being. All in less than ten minutes. A little break in your day.
How Thinking About Your Ancestors Can Help You Thrive
21-12-2023
How Thinking About Your Ancestors Can Help You Thrive
Join our limited newsletter, The Science of Habits, to get curated, science-backed tips to help make your New Year's resolution stick in 2024. https://ggsc.berkeley.edu/podcasts/habits We explore how contemplating our heritage can make us feel more belonging, gratitude, and confidence in what we're capable of achieving. Link to episode transcript: https://tinyurl.com/5djerhbj Episode summary: Oral historian Mi'Jan Celie Tho-Biaz knows the profound impact the past can have on the present. For our show, Mi’Jan tried a lab-tested writing practice that took the historical facts she knew about her own family further – by way of her imagination. She journaled about her great-great grandmother Emma, the last enslaved person in her family, and her late father, Njoroge , imagining what they might say to her today.We also hear from psychologist  Susan Moore about how learning about your ancestors can help you feel a sense of self-knowledge, gratitude and belonging. Practice: Imagine an ancestor in your family lineage. It can be someone you have known or someone from centuries ago.Spend the next 5-15 minutes writing about them. If you don’t know the details, imagine how their life would have been. Write down anything that comes to mind such as their way of life, their profession or what they looked like.Next imagine what they would tell you if they were alive today. What specific insights, advice or feedback would they give you? Write down your reflections. Today’s guests: Mi'Jan Celie Tho-Biaz is an artist, documentarian and oral historian. Learn more about Mi’Jan Celie Tho-Biaz’s work: http://tinyurl.com/5e8t9ha7 Follow Mi’Jan on Instagram: http://tinyurl.com/mr3yp3kz Susan Moore is a psychology professor at the Swinburne University of Technology. Follow Susan on Twitter:http://tinyurl.com/mr3vsr2k Resources from The Greater Good Science Center: How Teens Today Are Different from Past Generations: http://tinyurl.com/y5ffwavr Don’t Be So Quick to Stereotype Generations: http://tinyurl.com/mrxx7xfj How Collective Trauma Can Hurt the Next Generation: http://tinyurl.com/2vunsm2z Find Purpose by Connecting Across Generations: http://tinyurl.com/h4yyjesh More Resources on Connecting with Ancestors: NPR- 8 listeners share the powerful ways they keep in touch with their ancestors: http://tinyurl.com/48kjmenk Harvard - How Family History Can Inspire Accountable Reparations and Foster Ancestral Healing: http://tinyurl.com/ta24x773 TED - How to be a good ancestor: http://tinyurl.com/54zvkzsv How do you connect with your family history? Email us at happinesspod@berkeley.edu or use the hashtag #happinesspod. Help us share The Science of Happiness! Rate us on Spotify and share this link with someone who might like the show: http://tinyurl.com/yv69erdh
Happiness Break: A Meditation for Seeking Forgiveness, With Shelly Tygielski
14-12-2023
Happiness Break: A Meditation for Seeking Forgiveness, With Shelly Tygielski
Join our limited newsletter The Science of Habits to get curated, science-backed tips to help make your New Years resolution stick in 2024. https://ggsc.berkeley.edu/podcasts/habits When we practice forgiveness, studies show we can have healthier relationships, higher self-esteem, and less anxiety and depression. Link to episode transcript: https://tinyurl.com/mt9uwad8 How to Do This Practice: Find a comfortable place to begin the practice. Soften your gaze and take a few slow, deep breaths.Imagine there is a light made of compassion, love and understanding all around you.As the light comforts you, think of a person you would like to seek forgiveness from. Take note of any emotions that arise. Imagine sincerely apologizing to them.Visualize a bridge connecting you and the individual. Know that while forgiveness is not always immediately accepted, you've taken the first step towards healing.Turn your forgiveness towards yourself, breathing in love and compassion.End this practice by reconnecting with your body and refocusing your gaze, remembering that the journey of forgiveness is ongoing. .Today’s Happiness Break host: Shelly Tygielski is a trauma-informed mindfulness teacher based in Florida. To get Shelly Tygielski and Justin Michael Williams’ book How We Ended Racism: go to howweendedracism.com or your favorite book seller. Learn more about Shelly’s work: https://tinyurl.com/26xkdnku Follow Shelly on Instagram: https://tinyurl.com/4k4bx3nn Follow Shelly on Facebook: https://tinyurl.com/bdfsb9pt Follow Shelly on Twitter: https://tinyurl.com/2edu2fzu More resources from The Greater Good Science Center: Eight Keys to Forgiveness: https://tinyurl.com/2s4hbz3a The New Science of Forgiveness: https://tinyurl.com/5f2c7sfb How to Overcome Barriers to Forgiveness: https://tinyurl.com/22zteuyj The Power of Forgiveness at Work: https://tinyurl.com/mrx5hzvh How to Build a More Forgiving Community: https://tinyurl.com/5frja2h2 We love hearing from you! Tell us about your experience with forgiveness. Email us at happinesspod@berkeley.edu or use the hashtag #happinesspod. Find us on Spotify: https://tinyurl.com/6s39rzus Help us share Happiness Break! Rate us and copy and share this link: https://tinyurl.com/6s39rzus We're living through a mental health crisis. Between the stress, anxiety, depression, loneliness, burnout — we all could use a break to feel better. That's where Happiness Break comes in. In each biweekly podcast episode, instructors guide you through research-backed practices and meditations that you can do in real-time. These relaxing and uplifting practices have been shown in a lab to help you cultivate calm, compassion, connection, mindfulness, and more — what the latest science says will directly support your well-being. All in less than ten minutes. A little break in your day.
When It's Hard To Connect, Try Being Curious
07-12-2023
When It's Hard To Connect, Try Being Curious
Join our limited newsletter The Science of Habits to get curated, science-backed tips to help make your New Years resolution stick in 2024. https://ggsc.berkeley.edu/podcasts/habits When we're more curious, we are more likely to be happier and have stronger relationships. Try deepening your curiosity with these science-backed practices from author Scott Shigeoka. Link to episode transcript: https://tinyurl.com/276u4yxu Episode summary: As a cardiologist and immigrant in the United States, Stephanie Hsiao has always placed an emphasis on advancing her skills in order to succeed. So when she received the diagnosis that her son was neurodiverse, Stephanie went immediately into action mode to help her son — but she felt like she was missing something. For our show, Stephanie tried a practice to cultivate “deep curiosity,” and found that a curious outlook helped her to check her assumptions about parenting and discover her son’s strengths and interests. Later, we hear from curiosity expert Scott Shigeoka about the difference between shallow and deep curiosity, and how it can help us forge stronger connections with others. Practice: Before engaging in curiosity: Slow down, focus on your breathing. Set an intention to focus on curiosity and maybe visualize yourself being curious.While in conversation: Be open to being wrong, continuously check your assumptions, and actively turn towards those who are seeking your attention.Going forward: Make commitments to yourself and with others to engage in difficult, but open-minded interactions. Today’s guests: Stephanie Hsiao is a mother and cardiologist based in San Francisco, California. Scott Shigeoka is an author and storyteller who focuses on themes of curiosity and well-being. Order Scott Shigeoka’s book Seek: How Curiosity can Transform Your Life and Save the World: https://tinyurl.com/4jrxbupj Learn More About Scott’s work: https://tinyurl.com/y5xyxky7 Follow Scott on Instagram: https://tinyurl.com/3acu6jhm Follow Scott on Twitter: https://tinyurl.com/3m3k3bm9 Resources from The Greater Good Science Center: Six Surprising Benefits of Curiosity: https://tinyurl.com/7kcr32su How to Stay Open and Curious in Hard Conversations: https://tinyurl.com/y2f2e9ce Why Curious People Have Better Relationships: https://tinyurl.com/2xw5y9yr Does Curiosity Have a Dark Side? https://tinyurl.com/5n88wzyd How Curiosity Can Help Us Overcome Disconnection: https://tinyurl.com/9kaas6nz More Resources on Curiosity: BBC - Curiosity: The neglected trait that drives success: https://tinyurl.com/38bubaak Harvard - A Curious Mind: https://tinyurl.com/324hyzv4 TED - How Curiosity Will Save Us: https://tinyurl.com/muswe2y5 Tell us about your experience with being curious. Email us at happinesspod@berkeley.edu or use the hashtag #happinesspod. Help us share The Science of Happiness! Rate us on Spotify and share this link with someone who might like the show: https://tinyurl.com/m6aezjce This episode was supported by a grant from the John Templeton Foundation, as part of our project on "Expanding Awareness of the Science of Intellectual Humility." To learn more, go to https://tinyurl.com/2dj6hw29