Mental Health for Leaders

Lindsay Recknell

You are a People Leader or a HR professional, working hard to create an amazing employee experience for your team and your organization. But between the operational tasks of your job, managing emotions and politics both up and down the corporate ladder, and trying to find some semblance of work/life integration in your own life, I suspect you could be overwhelmed and burnt-out. Even the thought of navigating the complicated world of mental health at work probably seems like too much to handle. Let this podcast can be your not-so-secret weapon to help fix that! I am your host, Lindsay Recknell, and my mission is to help great leaders like you feel less awkward and more confident talking about mental health at work so you can stress less, take more action and continue to make a valuable difference in your job as a leader, positively impacting the lives of your people. I’ll be bringing you the experts, insights and actions that will give you the skills you need to navigate mental health in the workplace and foster a workplace where everyone’s mental health can thrive.

S07 | E03 Making Work Meaningful with Tamara Myles and Wes Adams
1w ago
S07 | E03 Making Work Meaningful with Tamara Myles and Wes Adams
Studies show that when employees find meaning in their work, they’re happier, more productive, more creative, and have higher wellbeing. And while individual employees need to do their part in finding that meaning, there’s only so much they can do without the support of their leadership. Since we work in communities, wellbeing and meaning are shared responsibilities, and leaders need to be intentional about their part in it if they want to set up their businesses for higher success.This week I’m joined by Tamara Myles and Wes Adams, who together have researched how leaders can make work more meaningful for their teams, and why it’s so imperative for success and workplace mental health that they do. They’re here to share tangible ideas and strategies leaders can use, and they break it down into simple objectives that can be implemented starting today.Listen in to hear more as Wes and Tamara talk about meaningful work, intentional leadership, and individual wellbeing in the workplace.About Tamara Myles:Tamara helps leaders make work meaningful to engage employees and improve business performance.Her approach blends the latest research in Positive and Organizational Psychology with evidence-based strategies to deliver solutions that yield tangible business results. She focuses on organizational transformation and leadership development and has worked with high-performing organizations like Black Rock, Microsoft, KPMG, Unilever, and Best Buy.Tamara is the author of The Secret to Peak Productivity: A Simple Guide to Reaching Your Personal Best, which is published globally and has been translated to multiple languages. Her work has been featured in Business Insider, Forbes, and USA Today, among others.Tamara lives in New England with her husband, three teenage children, and two dogs. She loves to cook and is in awe of the power of food to bring people together for deep, meaningful connection.About Wes Adams:Wes works with high-performing companies on organizational transformation, leadership development, and employee engagement. He helps both experienced and emerging leaders alike develop the skills and practices that bring out the best from their teams by fostering cultures that enable employees to find meaning and purpose in their work.He brings two decades of experience growing successful ventures and consulting for Fortune 500s, startups, and NGOs. Past clients include Microsoft, KPMG, Edelman, Harrah’s Entertainment, JP Morgan Chase, NetJets, Sony, Starwood Hotel Group, the United Nations Office of Human Rights, and Warner Brothers. Wes’s work has been covered by the New York Times, Forbes, Business Insider, Fast Company, and others.Wes is also a Master Facilitator for the Penn Resilience Program, and has been a featured speaker at South by Southwest Interactive and the Nobel Peace Prize Forum. Passionate about social impact, Wes produced a documentary for HBO, The Out List, and a book of interviews about the environmental crisis, I Am EcoWarrior.A graduate of Vanderbilt University, Wes holds a Master’s in Applied Positive Psychology (MAPP) from the University of Pennsylvania. He lives in Atlanta.Mentioned in this Episode of Mental Health for Leaders:SV Consulting GroupTamara Myles ConsultingConnect with Wes on LinkedInConnect with Tamara on LinkedInJoin the monthly digital subscriptionWhere to ListenSpotifyAppleGoogleAmazon
S07 | E02 Permission to be Human at Work with Jane M. Chun, PhD
20-09-2022
S07 | E02 Permission to be Human at Work with Jane M. Chun, PhD
Compassion and empathy are two words that are used interchangeably, and neither are necessarily accepted in the workplace. Sure, we all know the importance of taking personal experiences and challenges into consideration. But these are loaded words that aren’t always accepted.The thing is, compassion and empathy are two different things. Compassion is about recognizing someone else’s suffering while empathy is the response to that suffering. Compassion is inherent; humans naturally have this quality…until it’s trained out of us. And that is a tragedy.This week on the podcast, I’m talking with Jane M. Chun, PhD about encouraging leaders and teams to be human at work by practicing compassion on the job. There’s a whole field of compassion science and a movement toward more compassion and it felt so good to talk to someone whose whole career is built on compassion.In the episode, we talk about how leaders can be intentional about cultivating compassion, why changing your thinking about compassion might feel challenging, the difference between compassion and empathy, and why compassion is such a loaded word.About Jane M. Chun, PhD:Jane M. Chun is the Program Director overseeing Compassion Institute’s work in the health and systems transformation sectors. Jane’s expertise includes program development, change facilitation, partnership development, and research and learning.Jane has worked with intergovernmental and nonprofit organizations including UNICEF, UNDP, IOM, and Search for Common Ground, and has conducted research for institutions such as The Brookings Institution, Oxford Refugee Studies Center, and Viet Nam Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Development.Throughout the pandemic, Jane and her team have supported the mental health of healthcare and public health workers on the front lines of the pandemic. Through her experience in a range of settings, she has come to believe that deep social and systems transformation can only occur hand-in-hand with inner transformation. Focusing primarily on WHAT we do is not enough. We need to also inquire into HOW and WHY we do that work.Mentioned in this Episode of Mental Health for Leaders:Compassion InstituteConnect with Jane on LinkedInSeason 5 Episode 1: Live the Life You LoveMental Health Skills TrainingJoin the monthly digital subscriptionWhere to ListenSpotifyAppleGoogleAmazon
S07 | E01 Speaking the Right Language with Russell Stratton and Ken Cameron
13-09-2022
S07 | E01 Speaking the Right Language with Russell Stratton and Ken Cameron
Not all trainings and workshops are created equally, as I’m sure you can attest to. Meeting your audience where they’re at, using language that they can relate to, is key.But leaders aren’t born with the language they need to lead, and they often aren’t taught it either. So we need to turn to tools and resources to help us out.This week on the podcast, I’m talking with Ken Cameron and Russell Stratton about their new book, I Need to F**king Talk to You: The Art of Navigating Difficult Workplace Conversations and the trainings they do in organizations. Psychological safety isn’t a new conversation, but there’s definitely more attention being paid to it and organizations are finally starting to seek out solutions. But like we’ve said here before, “trainings” with someone talking from the stage isn’t going to crate change in leaders or team members. Instead, we need to create safe spaces where people can both practice having difficult conversations so the learnings transfer into the real workplace.Ken, Russell, and I talk through what this looks like and why front line workers in the trades are so good at it.About Russell Stratton:As the "Leadership Champ" Russell helps leaders EXCITE© their teams about their work. He believes that every leader has the potential to improve individual and team performance in their workplace. However, during his work with a great many leaders over 30 years, across a range of businesses, he's found that there is one particular challenge that holds them back - being able to have difficult conversations with team members, co-workers or even their boss.About Ken Cameron:One of Ken’s clients gave him the title “Facilitator of Thinking Differently”, and he’s proudly hung onto it ever since. Thinking Differently began in Ken’s first career as one of Canada’s most successful playwrights, directors and festival programmers. The unique combination allows him to create interactive and engaging sessions that result in key insights and eureka moments for your team.Ken comes to his creative approach as a consultant facilitator honestly. In addition to a Master of Fine Arts degree Ken is one of Canada's most successful playwrights, directors and arts administrators. Since 2012, Ken has used his creative background to design sessions that draw out all participants, especially the most introverted, who rarely have the opportunity to share their thoughts. He uses his administrative experience and endless curiosity, to fully understand the business so he can reframe your focus and increase your profitability. The unique combination leads to interactive and engaging sessions that result in key insights and eureka moments.Mentioned in this Episode of Mental Health for Leaders:I Need to F***ing Talk to You: The Art of Navigating Difficult Workplace Conversations by Russell Stratton and Ken CameronAmy Edmonson on Psychological SafetyJoin the monthly digital subscriptionWhere to ListenSpotifyAppleGoogleAmazon
S06 | E12 Clearing the Mental Mess with Rico Gomez
06-09-2022
S06 | E12 Clearing the Mental Mess with Rico Gomez
How leaders show up matters. Many are on board with performing at a higher level and encouraging their teams to do the same. Unfortunately, organizations feel that they need to “fix” employees quickly so they embrace one-and-done training programs that ultimately don’t work.Clearing the mental mess and engaging in transformational change takes dedication and practice. The best wellness and mindset practices take time to become habits, especially when you want them to stick.This week on the podcast, I’m talking with Rico Gomez, mental health coach to high performing athletes and corporate leaders. He shares more about the process of building habits that result in resilient leaders and trusting teams and how you too can clear your own mental mess!There’s a lot of knowledge in this episode, including the value of accountability, leading teams to success, keeping senior leadership engaged, and the difference between between your brain and your mind.It’s about the tools your leaders have and receive, and it’s within all of them to grow.About Rico Gomez:Certified in mental health with a background of psychology and counselling, Rico Gomez is a mental health coach.His passion is to help working professionals become unstuck from the mental chaos in order experience life to the fullest. Rico’s drive for mental health and well-being stems from his own battle with mental illness and being able to overcome the barriers of anxiety and depression.Mentioned in this Episode of Mental Health for Leaders:NeuroFitConnect with Rico on LinkedInMental Health Skills TrainingJoin the monthly digital subscriptionWhere to ListenSpotifyAppleGoogleAmazon
S06 | E11 Supporting Parents at Work with Haleigh Tebben
30-08-2022
S06 | E11 Supporting Parents at Work with Haleigh Tebben
It’s great that employers are starting to offer mental health care in their benefits packages for employees, but not enough are on board with supporting their families’ mental health. One thing parents want more than anything is to know their kids are okay and are getting the help they need. Thankfully, the tide might be turning in this arena. This week on the podcast, Haleigh Tebben of U.S.-based Brightline is sharing about how her organization is supporting children and how that’s making all the difference at work.The stigma around getting mental health support is going away, especially after COVID, but parents spend more time and money finding resources to help their children than they do for themselves. It feels like a no-brainer to take this off of parents’ plates so they can focus on themselves, which ultimately benefits their organization too.About Haleigh Tebben:Haleigh Tebben is the Chief Commercial Officer of Brightline, the leader in technology-enabled pediatric behavioral health care. In her role, she oversees all revenue-generating areas of the company, including sales, implementation, client success, marketing and health plan partnerships.Haleigh has over 20 years of experience in the health benefits and consulting industries. She previously served as the Chief Revenue Officer of Collective Health, a technology platform which enables employers to better manage their self-funded healthcare benefits. Prior to that, she led the Mercer Health & Benefits Practice in CA. She holds an MBA from UNO and received her undergraduate degree from Creighton University. Connect with Haleigh on LinkedIn.Mentioned in this Episode of Mental Health for Leaders:BrightlineFollow Brightline on Facebook and InstagramConnect with Brightline on LinkedIn and TwitterJoin the monthly digital subscriptionWhere to ListenSpotifyAppleGoogleAmazon
S06 | E10 Compounding Performance and Wellness with Deepak Saini
23-08-2022
S06 | E10 Compounding Performance and Wellness with Deepak Saini
Leaders get to where they are because of their resiliency and drive. Their no-nonsense attitudes and their tireless approach to growth and development. Right?Maybe. But that kind of drive can also lead to burnout if leaders aren’t careful about taking care of their whole selves. High stress jobs can lead to sleepless nights, missed meals, putting off exercise, poor nutrition, dehydration, myriad health problems, and more. Too much of that and leaders will find themselves just barely getting by.If this sounds all too familiar, you’ll want to tune into this week’s podcast episode with performance coach Deepak Saini. Staying healthy while performing at the peak of your professional career isn’t as difficult as it might feel. It takes some habit stacking, paying attention to your energy, and trying out things that help you decompress so you can get the most important thing to your health…a good night’s sleep.About Deepak Saini:Deepak Saini is a performance coach who knows what it is like to have a stressful corporate job, raising a family and trying to do the right things for his health.Eventually suffering from an autoimmune condition and injured back, these two health challenges ultimately became a turning point for him.He overcame those issues as well as his lifelong battle with obesity and brings a unique perspective to working with his clients.When this father of two is not spending time with his wife and little girls, he is researching and staying at the forefront of emerging and cutting-edge performance research.Deepak is also a speaker, course instructor, published writer and actively working on becoming a Centenarian.Mentioned in this Episode of Mental Health for Leaders:Season 2 Episode 9: Leadership Skills that Build Resilient Teams with Charmaine HammondEmail DeepakConnect with Deepak on LinkedInDeepak Saini HealthMental Health Skills TrainingJoin the monthly digital subscription
S06 | E08 The Workplace Lab with Dr. Tiffany Jana
09-08-2022
S06 | E08 The Workplace Lab with Dr. Tiffany Jana
Your workplace is a giant learning laboratory, where we can study human behavior and changes over time. And that’s exactly what this week’s guest, Dr. Tiffany Jana, Doc Jana, has been doing over the last 25 years.Doc Jana does JEDI work with organizations, though not the kind you might be thinking of. JEDI is justice, equity, diversity, and inclusion and according to Doc Jana, most people didn’t know what this work even was a handful of years ago.Today, it seems like everyone is talking about diversity work, and they should. But too many leaders and organizations are confused about what it should look like. Performative diversity hiring isn’t fair for anyone, and leaders who don’t recognize their own biases (which we all have) are part of the problem.What’s the solution? Doing the work. And this is just part of my conversation with Doc Jana. We can’t keep “checking the boxes;” we need to be clear about who we’re serving and how we can best do that by creating benchmarks that make sense, then following through with them.There’s always something to learn when it comes to diversity and the evolution of business. And this episode is no exception.About Dr. Tiffany Jana:Dr. Tiffany Jana (they/them/hers) is the founder and CEO of TMI’s Portfolio companies, now celebrating 19 years championing justice, equity, diversity, and inclusion (JEDI). Doc Jana spearheaded the TMI Consulting Inc.’s transition into the world’s first Certified Benefit Corporation (B Corp) with a diversity accountability focus. Doc Jana was awarded the B Corp community’s highest honor, the Tal Haussig Award, for blazing a path towards JEDI values in action.As the Founder of TMI’s Portfolio of companies, Doc Jana helps position the enterprise and our teams to best serve our myriad, complex client engagements. Doc Jana's vision is to redefine the future of inclusion; to manifest equity by creating an accountable, loving embrace of people and culture that includes an emphasis on liberation through joy. The workplace can and should be a welcoming, safe, and healthy environment where employees can thrive and grow. Doc Jana has been featured in numerous publications and media including Fast Company, NY Times, and Forbes for their work on diversity, equity, empowerment, and inclusion.They’ve done a TEDx on privilege and were named one of the Top 100 Leadership Speakers by Inc.com. Mentioned in this Episode of Mental Health for Leaders:Subtle Acts of Exclusion: How to Understand, Identify, and Stop Microaggressions by Tiffany JanaOvercoming Biases: Build Authentic Relationships Across Differences by Tiffany JanaTMI ConsultingDoc JanaSeeking Equanimity PodcastJoin the monthly digital subscription
S06 | E07 Answering “What is Wellbeing?” with Sarah McGuinness & Chris Hewitt
29-07-2022
S06 | E07 Answering “What is Wellbeing?” with Sarah McGuinness & Chris Hewitt
How do you define wellbeing? It has a lot of different meanings, and it really depends on what lens you’re looking through. That brings a challenge to organizations or teams that are trying to do the work.Many organizations have taken roles in human resources and tacked on “wellbeing” supervisor responsibilities. They know they need someone in that role but aren’t really willing to dedicate the necessary resources. And depending on what experience that new wellbeing professional has, this looks wildly different, even within different teams in the same organization.What can be done about this? Actually defining what wellbeing and wellness mean and creating space and time for the person in the role to perform effectively in this role.But to get to that point, the organization and its leaders need to be on board with the investment of time, talent, and resources. This week on the podcast, we’re talking to Sarah McGuinness and Chris Hewitt of Revolutionaries of Wellbeing about changes in corporate wellness programs, why being proactive benefits everyone, and how to look at wellness through a different lens.About Sarah McGuinness:Sarah McGuinness is a wellbeing disruptor, burnout awareness advocate and Founder/CEO of Revolutionaries of Wellbeing (ROW). ROW helps wellbeing leaders to be change makers and to create better workplaces, together. With a community of wellbeing champions from organisations around the globe, ROW is dedicated to helping leaders to develop professional expertise, access practical tools and resources, and network with peers and experts to meaningfully improve wellbeing.Sarah brings a wealth of knowledge and experience in corporate wellbeing and behaviour change and has supported well-known organisations to improve the wellbeing of their people, including Sealord, the NHS, nib and Weta.She draws on her honours degree in psychology and degree in communication, training in health behaviour, coaching, fitness and facilitation, plus a 15+ year career in the corporate sector specialising in leadership and organisational development in Australia and New Zealand.She is a passionate mental health and wellbeing champion and is determined to reduce stigma and improve conversations around mental health, particularly with having lived experience of burnout, anxiety, and fibromyalgia. She has been featured in the media including on Stuff, NBR, Newshub/TV3, MiNDFOOD, Newstalk ZB and RNZ. Connect with Sarah on LinkedIn.About Chris Hewitt:Chris is ROW's Commercial Partnerships Manager and brings 15 years of experience in the professional development and events fields, with his most recent previous role managing a commercial portfolio of publications and events in the health, safety and wellbeing industry. He brings a wealth of programme management and commercial partnership experience, and has strong networks across the health, safety and wellbeing sectors both in New Zealand and overseas.He cares deeply about workplace wellbeing and is passionate about helping businesses lift their wellbeing performance. Connect with Chris on LinkedIn.Mentioned in this Episode of Mental Health for Leaders:Revolutionaries of Wellbeing (ROW)Join the monthly digital subscription
S06 | E06 Removing Psychological Aggression from the Workplace with Dave Sewell
22-07-2022
S06 | E06 Removing Psychological Aggression from the Workplace with Dave Sewell
We talk about psychological safety a lot, but what does it even mean? That was the question Dave Sewell asked himself as he struggled in his former consulting gig. He watched teams leave toxic environments and it triggered something in him. Psychological aggression, the opposite of feeling safe at work, was running rampant among his clients. So he made a change. Before he truly defined psychological safety, he wrote the book on it. This week on the podcast, Dave and I talk about the science behind psychological aggression and why even subtle behaviors and responses can create an environment that doesn’t feel safe. And he shares how to flip that narrative by recognizing the inherent good in others. This all starts at the leadership level, where leaders recognize the power of their own body language so they can take more ownership of their team behavior and performance.It’s such an interesting conversation with real-world examples of what happens when we set out to work with humans, not grizzly bears!About Dave Sewell:Coming from a family of alcoholism and violence and being subjected in his early career to shame and ridicule, Dave has been fascinated why some leaders rule with the stick whilst other don’t and why do companies have both types of leaders within their organisation at the same time?His research around high performing teams, in particular what causes dysfunctional teams, bullying and office politics is at the leading edge of our understanding. Dave demonstrates how to overcome these by embracing psychological safety, something that should be at the core of all leadership training.When he’s not talking about leadership and helping teams, Dave spends his free time with his family; his wife Kirsty and his two sons Lachlan and Jamie.  His other interests are meditating and energetic healing, hiking, mountain biking and Xbox gaming. Connect with Dave on LinkedIn and follow him on Facebook.Mentioned in this Episode of Mental Health for Leaders:Join the monthly digital subscriptionSafe Leadership: Beating Stress to Drive Performance by Dave SewellThe Fearless Organization: Creating Psychological Safety in the Workplace for Learning, Innovation, and Growth by Amy EdmonsonThe Five Dysfunctions of a Team: A Leadership Fable by Patrick Lencioni
S06 | E05 Eliminating Toxic Leadership with Dr. Kevin Sansberry II
15-07-2022
S06 | E05 Eliminating Toxic Leadership with Dr. Kevin Sansberry II
Toxic workplaces persist, even in the face of organizations working in DEIB and trying to create cultures of organizational safety. The challenge is that there’s a knowledge gap. It’s difficult to hold individual leaders accountable for their behaviors when it’s normalized for them.The problem isn’t a lack of knowledge and doesn’t require a training of our leaders; it’s an unlearning that needs to happen, a gaining of wisdom that only happens through talking to others about how you and your behavior impacts them.On this week’s podcast, Dr. Kevin Sansberry II and I are talking about how to eliminate toxic workplaces, why they persevere, and what lived experiences and privilege has to do with it.One of the big messages to take away from this episode is that if it matters to one person, it matters. So if one person recognizes there’s a disconnect in behavior or communication, leaders need to own that and do something about it.This is a powerful conversation, and when we own our behaviors and shift our mindsets, we can make Mondays a whole lot less stressful.About Dr. Kevin Sansberry II:Dr. Kevin Sansberry II is a behavioral scientist and executive coach whose inspiring work is driven by the need for evidence-based, inclusive, and equitable approaches to urgently and proactively transform and coach leaders, eradicating toxic behaviors that threaten profitability, innovation, and the overall wellbeing.Kevin is regularly sought after to speak, consult, and coach organizations around the world related to his expertise in toxic leadership and toxic organizational culture.Kevin has experience in various settings such as professional sports, higher education, nonprofits, sales, and other large complex organizations. Kevin has written extensively on topics in various areas such as CEO narcissism, abusive supervision, workplace authenticity and is the creator and host of the top podcast focused on toxic leadership, The Toxic Leadership Podcast which reached as high as the number four nonprofit podcast in the United States in 2021.Kevin earned his doctorate in business administration from The University of Missouri-St. Louis where he focused on the impact of abusive supervision on organizational culture/climate, and employee coping behaviors. Kevin received his MBA from The University of Missouri-Kansas City with an emphasis in leadership & change in human systems and general management and his undergraduate degree in psychology from the University of Central Missouri.Mentioned in this Episode of Mental Health for Leaders:360 Degree TemplateMental Health Skills TrainingJoin the monthly digital subscription
S06 | E04 Better Leaders = Better Organizations with Zach Smith and Rod McDermott
08-07-2022
S06 | E04 Better Leaders = Better Organizations with Zach Smith and Rod McDermott
What if your employees and future leaders didn’t struggle with challenges at home or with their finances? Do you think they’d perform better at work?According to this week’s guests, they sure would! And they have the data to back it up.Everyone brings stress and anxiety to work. It’s a normal part of being human. But when leaders and aspiring leaders spend too much time in stressful situations they’re not as effective in their roles. Coaching can help, and organizations that offer coaching to employees help to improve the humans in their charge which creates better results for the company. It’s a win-win and we don’t do it enough. This week on the podcast, Rod McDermott and Zach Smith of Activate 180 share why it’s so important to provide coaching for employees, no matter where they are in the organization. Especially now, with so many leaders leaving and younger employees moving up quickly to fill their roles.This conversation is so hopeful for the potential of organizations overall and the teams and individuals the organizations support. Coaching isn’t designed to improve performance that might be lacking; it’s for helping team members show up as their best selves to help maximize their impact in the company.About Rod McDermott:Rod McDermott is the CEO + Co-Founder of Activate 180, which helps companies elevate employee performance, productivity, and happiness through affordable coaching for all; the CEO + Co-Founder of McDermott + Bull, one of the fastest-growing executive search firms in North America with offices domestically and internationally; the President + CEO of M+B Interim Leaders, which he founded along with Angela Anderson in 2011 to address an increased client need for time-sensitive solutions to important leadership challenges; and the Founder of the M+B Executive Network, a community of in-transition senior-level executives seeking guidance to land their next role, serving over 10,000 members since inception.Rod has been an entrepreneur for over 20 years, growing companies from the ground up and challenging industry norms. His ultimate goal is to meaningfully contribute to the greater good, which is showcased through his passion for hard work, fostering relationships, and conceptualizing solutions for professional development. Connect with Rod on LinkedIn.About Zach Smith:Zach Smith is the Chief Activation Officer + Co-Founder of Activate 180. He has been a trusted voice in mindset, career optimization, and leadership coaching for over 10 years. Zach has coached thousands of employees across mid-market and enterprise-level organizations, aligning their careers with true calling and passion to create total life fulfillment.Before becoming an award-winning coach, Zach spent more than 10 years in senior marketing and client relationship management roles for well-known, international consumer beverage brands. Zach trained with the Ascension Leadership Academy’s coaching program, graduating from their highest level course. He is a sought-after keynote speaker who regularly appears before audiences at industry conferences and events. Connect with Zach on LinkedIn.Connect with Activate 180 on LinkedIn and Instagram.Mentioned in this Episode of Mental Health for Leaders:Activate 180Mental Health Skills TrainingJoin the monthly digital subscription
S06 | E03 Support Your Human Capital with Jim Link
01-07-2022
S06 | E03 Support Your Human Capital with Jim Link
The humans in your organization are the most important asset you have. It’s essential that you take care of them, especially as we come out of the pandemic. There’s an overwhelming feeling of isolation that employees felt in the last few years and the confusion of today is causing the isolation to linger.What’s a leader to do? Go back to foundations. Empathy is the single most important skill that leaders can and should use to ensure that employees feel safe and heard. Unfortunately, empathy is also a skill that we’ve been trained out of using in the workplace.This week on the podcast, I’m talking with Jim Link, chief human resources officer at the Society for Human Resource Management. This is the conversation that will change your mind about having mental health conversations at work, if I haven’t already convinced you. We talk about why mental health support will save your organization money, how to engage leaders in conversations around supporting employees in this way, and how tech can free up the HR managers’ time so they can be the empathetic people person they want to be.So many ah-ha moments to be had here! About Jim Link:Jim Link is the Chief Human Resources Officer for SHRM, the Society for Human Resource Management. Jim’s experience includes roles of increasing responsibility in human resources, mergers and acquisitions, and operational effectiveness. His personal interests include talent acquisition management, employee and leadership development, equality and equity, employee engagement, internal innovation, and driving rapid business scalability through both organic and inorganic, often complex, growth opportunities.Born and raised on a working family farm, Link brings an agile, transparent, can-do approach to his client’s needs. Equally effective from manufacturing floor to board room, his natural curiosity and resourcefulness generates long lasting relationships that drive value creation and sustainable business results.As a recognized thought leader in human capability and the future of work, Jim is a sought-after commentator with the national and international press, features widely on the lecture and speaker circuit, and consults with leaders, companies and boards of directors around the world on matters related to the workplace. Additionally, he is in his tenth year as an adjunct professor teaching Human Resources Strategy in the MBA program at the Poznan School of Economics in Poznan, Poland and entering his second year teaching the same topic to graduate students in Yangon, Myanmar.While serving on boards of advisors for several early-stage companies, Jim is a board member of the Society of Human Resource Management (SHRM) Foundation and the Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta Human Capital Advisory Council. He is active with a number of charitable organizations in his community and is certified as a SHRM Senior Certified Professional (SHRM-SCP).Mentioned in this Episode of Mental Health for Leaders:Join the monthly digital subscriptionMental Health for Leaders TrainingLifeGuides
S06 | E02 Unlocking Your Leadership Potential with Alex Alonso
24-06-2022
S06 | E02 Unlocking Your Leadership Potential with Alex Alonso
When we take care of our leaders and their mental health, we’re all able to show up as our best selves--at work and at home. As leaders in human resources, we can do this by unlocking potential by supporting them to growth their mental health skills - in empathy, leadership, and coping with challenges.This is important because organizations that are viewed as highly empathetic have employees that are more likely to positively talk about their company to friends, peers, and families. And organizations that truly focus on culture are twice as likely to retain their employees.We’re in a world of change, with the great resignation and the lesser-talked about great retirement. Both are impacting the workplace in ways we couldn’t have predicted.This week on the podcast, I’m happy to share this and more with you from Dr. Alexander Alonso, the Society for Human Resource Management’s (SHRM) Chief Knowledge Cfficer. We’re talking about unlocking leadership potential, the benefits of having taboo conversations, why we need to hold onto our talent, and so much more. Alex also shares more about the conversations he had at the recent SHRM conference and his newest book about making the most of polarizing conversations.About Alexander Alonso:Alexander Alonso, PhD, SHRM-SCP is the Society for Human Resource Management's (SHRM's) Chief Knowledge Officer leading operations for SHRM's Certified Professional and Senior Certified Professional certifications, research functions, and the SHRM Knowledge Advisor service.   He is responsible for all research activities, including the development of the SHRM Competency Model and SHRM credentials.  During his career, he has worked with numerous subject matter experts worldwide with the aim of identifying performance standards, developing competency models, designing organizational assessments, and conducting job analyses.   He was also responsible for working on contract task orders involving the development of measurement tools for content areas such as job knowledge (like teacher knowledge of instructional processes) and organizational climates (like organizational climate forecasting in military health care).Throughout his career, he has published works in peer-reviewed journals such as Industrial and Organizational Psychology: Perspectives on Science and Practice, Journal of Applied Psychology, International Journal of Selection and Assessment, People and Strategy, Personality and Individual Differences, Quality and Safety in Health Care, and Human Resources Management Review.  He has also authored several chapters on community-based change initiatives in workforce readiness, as well as co-authoring Defining HR Success: A Guide to the SHRM Competency Model in Practice.Dr. Alonso also served as a columnist analyzing major trends in the workforce for The Industrial Psychologist and HR Magazine. In addition, he has served on several professional society boards including the SIOP and the Personnel Testing Council of Metropolitan Washington. Mentioned in this Episode of Mental Health for Leaders:Talking Taboo: Making the Most of Polarizing Discussions at Work by Alexander AlonsoThink Again by Adam GrantWendi Safstrom: The Need to Prioritize Mental Health at WorkMental Health Skills TrainingJoin the monthly digital subscription
S06 | E01 SHRM Round-up: Close the Skills Gap
17-06-2022
S06 | E01 SHRM Round-up: Close the Skills Gap
I recently attended the Society of Human Resources Management conference (SHRM) in New Orleans, Louisiana and had the pleasure of attending many sessions and connecting with a handful of speakers talking about mental health in the workplace. Of course you know this is my happy place!If you listened to Season 5 of the podcast, you can listen in to those conversations. Nicole Butts and I talked about organizational justice, Wendi Safstrom shared about the need to prioritize mental health at work, and Daryll Bryant talked about how to flourish at work. Of course, there were many other episodes in Season 5, all equally important.The theme of the conference was Cause the Effect You Want to See, and Jeaneen Andrews-Feldman, chief marketing and experience officer for SHRM talked about this on the first episode of the season. I talk about some of my own biggest takeaways from the conference on this week’s episode, and they include connection, culture, and employee experience. And I wanted to hear from some of the attendees about their takeaways too.Listen in as I get feedback from five attendees and they share their answers to the questions:What is the top mental health skill HR leaders need to know?What is greatest opportunity for employers in the future of work?Where would you start if you were asked to elevate employee experience with greatest impact?Mentioned in this Episode of Mental Health for Leaders:Wendi Safstrom: The Need to Prioritize Mental Health at WorkJeaneen Andrews-Feldman: Cause the Effect You Want to SeeDan Jolivet, The StandardRob Whalen, PTO ExchangeDan Murdoch, NayyaDr. Margarida Rafael, WorkzingaJosh Tolleson, University of Louisiana at MonroeBlink by Malcolm GladwellSHRM Annual Conference & ExpoMental Health Skills Training
S05 | E13 Laughing at Work is Totally Okay with Greg Schwem
10-06-2022
S05 | E13 Laughing at Work is Totally Okay with Greg Schwem
Countless studies have shown that laughing is a good way to relieve stress. And even if we love our job and our teammates, there’s always an element of stress in the workplace.So why not find ways to spice it up with some humor?According to Greg Schwem, comedian and corporate speaker, humor is disappearing from the corporate world just when we need it the most. Organizations are shying away from using humor of any kind for fear of offending someone. But the reality is that the positive benefits of humor far outweigh the negative ramifications.Human resource departments are charged with fostering a fun and healthy work envioronment. Employee experience is a huge part of that. On this episode, Greg shares how organizations can improve the employee experience through humor without risking offensive jokes. We talk about the best kind of humor to use, why humor and laughing is so good for us, how to navigate the fine line between good humor and bad humor, and what role communication plays in humor at work.Greg’s presentation at the SHRM conference is Is it Okay to Laugh, and after listening you’re certain to say a resounding yes.About Greg Schwem:HuffPost calls Greg Schwem "Your boss's favorite comedian." He has spent 25 years making the business world laugh at itself, with clients ranging from Microsoft to the CIA.  He will be addressing the SHRM 2022 conference with his latest keynote, "You Can't Cancel Laughter."  Greg has appeared on Comedy Central, Drybar Comedy, opened for musical superstars such as Celine Dion and Keith Urban and can be heard regularly on SIRIUS/XM Radio's Laugh USA. Follow Greg on Instagram and Facebook and connect with him on LinkedIn.Mentioned in this Episode of Mental Health for Leaders:Greg's talk at the SHRM22 Conference - You Can't Cancel Laughter: Understanding How Stifling Workplace Humor Can Also Stifle Creativity and RetentionSHRM Annual Conference & ExpoMental Health Skills Training
S05 | E12 Compassion in Leadership with Marissa Afton
08-06-2022
S05 | E12 Compassion in Leadership with Marissa Afton
The reality of the pandemic has impacted the workplace in many ways the past couple years, some more expected than others. One thing that leaders are finding is that after so much time working from home and being more vulnerable, employees are looking to have a more genuine connection with their coworkers. Gone are the days of putting on your work persona before clocking in. People are expecting authenticity, openness, and organizations that value them for who they are.Along with this cultural shift, it’s important for leadership to learn how to be compassionate. What does being a compassionate leader mean? Why is it beneficial to your, your people, and your organization? Can you just learn how to be a compassionate leader?Today I’m joined by Marissa Afton, compassionate leader expert, and she answers these questions and more. Marissa explains the difference between compassion and empathy (and why we need both) and the different types of compassionate leaders she’s found in her work. Tune in to learn how having a human-focused approach will lead to more success for your team and less burnout for yourselfAbout Marissa Afton:Marissa Afton is a driving force behind leadership development and change initiatives at multinational companies. She helps leaders and organizations unlock their potential to create cultural excellence and superior performance, resilience, and innovation.A mindfulness practitioner for over 25 years, Marissa is recognized for her breadth of knowledge and deep experience in transforming organizations by transforming the mind. She is a sought-after speaker at leading HR and leadership conferences about the impact of mind training on high-performance cultures, as well as the mental qualities of excellent leaders. She has worked with leading companies, including Accenture, Bloomberg, Cisco, Eli Lilly, and others.Marissa is co-author of Compassionate Leadership: How to Do Hard Things in a Human Way (HBR Press 2022). She also has written articles for various publications, including Harvard Business Review and Fast Company.Mentioned in this Episode of Mental Health for Leaders:Potential ProjectSHRM ConferenceCompassionate Leadership: How to Do Hard Things in a Human WayInsight by Tasha EurichFind Potential Project on LinkedInMarissa's talk at the SHRM22 Conference - Compassionate Leadership: How to Do Hard Things in Human WaysSHRM Annual Conference & ExpoMental Health Skills Training
S05 | E11 Leveraging Your Influence with Vivian Blade
06-06-2022
S05 | E11 Leveraging Your Influence with Vivian Blade
With an increasing number of employees leaving their organizations as part of the Great Resignation, it’s more important than ever that we as people leaders create an environment where employees feel valued and want to be. A great way to do this is by developing your influence in the workplace, over your people, work culture, and organization.Today I’m joined by Vivian Blade, leadership expert and thought leader, to discuss skills and tactics that leaders can use to have more influence in the workplace, including influencing up the ladder, and how to leverage that influence for your own mental health. By utilizing these tactics and developing these skills, we can create workplaces with higher trust, engagement, and psychological safety.Listen in as Vivian details the Influence with SCALE framework and what being influential really means, so we can start leveraging our influence for positive change today.About Vivian Blade:Recognized as one of Engagedly’s Top 100 Global HR Influencers of 2021, Vivian Blade is a sought-after leadership expert and thought leader. She works with the world’s top brands to build better, more resilient workplaces, equipping leaders to solve the pressing burnout, turnover, and workplace culture challenges your company is struggling with right now. Her impact is felt as a frequent keynote speaker, and in delivering transformative leadership development programs, executive and team coaching, and corporate consulting. She also works in academia as an Adjunct Professor of Leadership and Project Management for the University of Louisville College of Business.Vivian is the author of four books, most recently the Amazon #1 best-seller Resilience Ready: The Leader’s Guide to Thriving Through Unrelenting Crises, and Influence in Talent Development.To learn more you can visit Vivian’s website and connect with her on LinkedIn and Twitter.Mentioned in this Episode of Mental Health for Leaders:Vivian’s websiteInfluence with ScaleResilience ReadyFuelforwardVivian's talk at the SHRM22 Conference - SCALE Your Influence: How to Elevate Your Influence, Respect, and Impact in HRSHRM Annual Conference & ExpoMental Health Skills Training
S05 | E10 Virtual Work & Respect with Lorie Reichel-Howe
03-06-2022
S05 | E10 Virtual Work & Respect with Lorie Reichel-Howe
Communication feels very different when we’re working virtually. But even through we’re screen-to-screen, we still need to be respectful and have expectations and guidelines around what’s appropriate and what’s not.We’ve learned from the last few years that it’s easy to feel isolated when we’re not in-person. So regular check-ins and conversations is essential. But what does that look like? And how do you communicate with others who don’t have their cameras on?On this episode of the podcast, Lorie Reichel-Howe of Conversations in the Workplace is talking about just that. With so many different cultures in every workplace, we need to have these conversations so we can set norms that work for everyone. Lorie shares scripts you can use to start difficult conversations, what it means to host a true training around conversations, and some examples of boundaries that get crossed in both virtual and in-person conversations.What’s so interesting about this interview and Lorie’s presentation for SHRM is that this may not have been a conversation we had too often prior to the pandemic. It’s a critical one now!About Lorie Reichel-Howe:Lorie Reichel-Howe is founder of Conversations in the Workplace. She equips managers, teams, and business professionals to have “Safe Conversations” – transformative dialogue that uncovers hidden workplace issues. Whether addressing challenging team dynamics, mismanaged expectations,  cultural insensitivity, or good old-fashioned bad behavior, “Safe Conversations” foster greater innovation, inclusion, and collaboration within organizations.With over 20 years of experience in communications and relationship management, training and development, Lorie is passionate about supporting organizations in creating a culture where people love where they work and love the people they work with.Lorie is a professional mediator and conflict coach. She has supported organizations such as Pinterest, SHRM, PIHRA, HR.com, Pinterest, Women in Technology International, Los Angeles Women’s Leadership Conference, Girl Scouts of Greater Los Angeles, Santa Clara Superior Court, San Jose State University, Santa Clara County Office of Education and many more. Connect with her on LinkedIn.Mentioned in this Episode of Mental Health for Leaders:Lorie's talk at the SHRM22 Conference - Creating a Culture of Respect While Working Remotely SHRM Annual Conference & ExpoMental Health Skills Training
S05 | E09 Emotional Technology and Work with Javier Santos
01-06-2022
S05 | E09 Emotional Technology and Work with Javier Santos
There’s a common misconception about leadership, and that’s that we’re paid to be rational and not emotional. But in reality, our emotions are what make us human. And don’t we want human leaders who constantly push their feelings down. For one, it’s physically unhealthy. And for another, it doesn’t open up the space for others to feel included and like their emotions matter. Because they do.On this episode of the podcast, Javier Santos is sharing about emotional technology, the evidence that shows us the value of neuropsychoanalysis and how our brains map memories to make life easier for us in the future.This episode is fascinating because we haven’t always had the brain science behind what psychologists suspected all along. Now that we do, we can utilize that knowledge to understand how our emotions work and set ourselves up for success. Javier and I discuss neuroplasticity and our changing brains, the implications on our health if we push back our emotions, how our brains are wired to save energy, and how emotions and inclusion are connected.About Javier Santos:Javier Santos is a Canadian diverse entrepreneur and international speaker on mental and emotional health at work. Javier redefines what is possible by using our emotional capital to become happier and more productive at work. He founded The House of Purpose to help companies improve the human and subjective side of work, affected today by burnout, unresolved conflicts, and prejudices.Mentioned in This Episode of Mental Health in Minutes:Connect with Javier on LinkedInThe House of PurposeJavier's talk at the SHRM22 Conference - Mental Health and Inclusion - Use Emotional Technology in Your D and I Transformation Strategy SHRM Annual Conference & ExpoMental Health Skills Training